Session Title

Far Out! (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

BABEL Working Group

Organizer Name

Suzanne Conklin Akbari

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Presider Name

Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, Lara Farina

Presider Affiliation

George Washington Univ., West Virginia Univ.

Paper Title 1

Discussant

Presenter 1 Name

Dorothy Kim

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Vassar College

Paper Title 2

Discussant

Presenter 2 Name

Melissa Ridley Elmes

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of North Carolina-Greensboro

Paper Title 3

Discussant

Presenter 3 Name

Anna Wilson

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 4

Discussant

Presenter 4 Name

Matthew Bryan Gillis

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Tennessee-Knoxville

Paper Title 5

Discussant

Presenter 5 Name

Karen Cook

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of Hartford

Paper Title 6

Discussant

Presenter 6 Name

Drew Daniel

Presenter 6 Affiliation

Johns Hopkins Univ.

Start Date

14-5-2016 10:00 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 1005

Description

Far Out! [A Roundtable]

The second of the BABEL Working Group’s linked panels will discuss methods, affiliations, and inquiries that come close to – or even cross – the limits of “serious scholarship” and “acceptable work” in medieval studies. We seek examples of eccentric researchers, inconvenient amateurs, crazy ideas, and questionable medievalisms as material for thinking about what our disciplines and institutions will tolerate, what they will not, and why. Have we, as a field, abandoned interesting ideas and approaches because they are too far from the mainstream? Scholars such as Candace Barrington, Brantley Bryant, Louise D’Arcens, Carolyn Dinshaw, Stephanie Trigg, Richard Utz, Lawrence Warner, and Anna Wilson have productively raised the issue, and the Material Collective hosted a rich session at the ICMS in 2014 on “Faking It.” As a favorite phrase of the North American counterculture, “far out” expresses enthusiasm as well as surprise at the unexpected; in this spirit, we seek to locate the points at which medieval scholarship or medievalist creations hover provocatively between genius and junk. Presenters may discuss, among other topics: hippie/New Age medievalisms, wishful thinking, terrible reconstructions, tattoo Celticism, Beowulf for capitalists, discredited research, fanfic and cosplay, argumentative wrong turns, poetics and performance art, conspiracy theorists, ciphers and cryptology, gaming communities and online collectives, and academic distaste. Alternately, they may propose projects, pedagogies, and perspectives that are utterly and unabashedly “out there.”

Suzanne C. Akbari , Eileen A. Joy , Myra Seaman

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May 14th, 10:00 AM

Far Out! (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 1005

Far Out! [A Roundtable]

The second of the BABEL Working Group’s linked panels will discuss methods, affiliations, and inquiries that come close to – or even cross – the limits of “serious scholarship” and “acceptable work” in medieval studies. We seek examples of eccentric researchers, inconvenient amateurs, crazy ideas, and questionable medievalisms as material for thinking about what our disciplines and institutions will tolerate, what they will not, and why. Have we, as a field, abandoned interesting ideas and approaches because they are too far from the mainstream? Scholars such as Candace Barrington, Brantley Bryant, Louise D’Arcens, Carolyn Dinshaw, Stephanie Trigg, Richard Utz, Lawrence Warner, and Anna Wilson have productively raised the issue, and the Material Collective hosted a rich session at the ICMS in 2014 on “Faking It.” As a favorite phrase of the North American counterculture, “far out” expresses enthusiasm as well as surprise at the unexpected; in this spirit, we seek to locate the points at which medieval scholarship or medievalist creations hover provocatively between genius and junk. Presenters may discuss, among other topics: hippie/New Age medievalisms, wishful thinking, terrible reconstructions, tattoo Celticism, Beowulf for capitalists, discredited research, fanfic and cosplay, argumentative wrong turns, poetics and performance art, conspiracy theorists, ciphers and cryptology, gaming communities and online collectives, and academic distaste. Alternately, they may propose projects, pedagogies, and perspectives that are utterly and unabashedly “out there.”

Suzanne C. Akbari , Eileen A. Joy , Myra Seaman