Session Title

Ethically A’twitter, or A-twitter? Attending, Attention, and Access with or without the Live-Tweet (A Panel Discussion)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Benjamin Ambler

Organizer Affiliation

Arizona State Univ./Dwight Englewood School

Presider Name

Benjamin Ambler

Paper Title 1

Panelist

Presenter 1 Name

Jonathan Hsy

Presenter 1 Affiliation

George Washington Univ.

Paper Title 2

Panelist

Presenter 2 Name

Angela R. Bennett-Segler

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Nevada-Reno

Paper Title 3

Panelist

Presenter 3 Name

Peter Konieczny

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Medievalists.net

Paper Title 4

Panelist

Presenter 4 Name

Kristen Mapes

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Michigan State Univ.

Paper Title 5

Panelist

Presenter 5 Name

Eileen A. Joy

Presenter 5 Affiliation

BABEL Working Group

Paper Title 6

Panelist

Presenter 6 Name

John P. Sexton

Presenter 6 Affiliation

Bridgewater State Univ.

Start Date

14-5-2016 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1140

Description

The recent rise in (Medieval Studies) conference attendees’ “live tweeting” of the goings-on of sessions raises a number of ethical questions about how we might respectfully engage with colleagues present and absent, such as (1) to what extent is session attendees’ attention drawn away from the presenter when tweeting via an in-hand smartphone, tablet, or laptop computer? Does, or can, live-tweeting distract any more than hand-writing one’s own notes? (2) Do “cross-pollinating” live-tweets of simultaneous, but related, sessions enhance post-session/conference scholarly discourse, or further diminish attentive engagement with the session — or some measure of both? (3) Where a presenter’s paper, or an attendee's question, is often given as ephemeral, preliminary, or a work in progress, should it be published, as it were, to the public forum of the internet — and can presented research be accurately represented in segments of 140 characters or less? (4) Does live-tweeting of sessions provide intellectually reasonable access to our colleagues, or others, who may not be able to physically attend the session due to, e.g., financial hardship or physical dis/ability?

This session's panelists will offer a full range of opinions on these and other questions in opening remarks, considering also how medieval notions of readership and authorship might inform the conversation. They will then open conversation with all those in attendance.

Ben JD Ambler

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May 14th, 10:00 AM

Ethically A’twitter, or A-twitter? Attending, Attention, and Access with or without the Live-Tweet (A Panel Discussion)

Schneider 1140

The recent rise in (Medieval Studies) conference attendees’ “live tweeting” of the goings-on of sessions raises a number of ethical questions about how we might respectfully engage with colleagues present and absent, such as (1) to what extent is session attendees’ attention drawn away from the presenter when tweeting via an in-hand smartphone, tablet, or laptop computer? Does, or can, live-tweeting distract any more than hand-writing one’s own notes? (2) Do “cross-pollinating” live-tweets of simultaneous, but related, sessions enhance post-session/conference scholarly discourse, or further diminish attentive engagement with the session — or some measure of both? (3) Where a presenter’s paper, or an attendee's question, is often given as ephemeral, preliminary, or a work in progress, should it be published, as it were, to the public forum of the internet — and can presented research be accurately represented in segments of 140 characters or less? (4) Does live-tweeting of sessions provide intellectually reasonable access to our colleagues, or others, who may not be able to physically attend the session due to, e.g., financial hardship or physical dis/ability?

This session's panelists will offer a full range of opinions on these and other questions in opening remarks, considering also how medieval notions of readership and authorship might inform the conversation. They will then open conversation with all those in attendance.

Ben JD Ambler