Session Title

Before/After Constantinus Africanus: Medicine in the Beneventan Zone and Beyond I

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Society for Beneventan Studies

Organizer Name

Richard F. Gyug

Organizer Affiliation

Fordham Univ.

Presider Name

Richard F. Gyug

Paper Title 1

De innumeris remediorum utilitatibus: Constructing a Medical Recipe Collection at Early Medieval Montecassino

Presenter 1 Name

Jeffrey Doolittle

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Fordham Univ.

Paper Title 2

Constantine's Viaticum in the Beneventan Zone and Beyond

Presenter 2 Name

Andrew J. M. Irving, Brian P. Long

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame/Cologne Center for eHumanities, Whitman College

Paper Title 3

Byzantine Medicine at Monte Cassino during the Time of Constantine the African

Presenter 3 Name

F. Eliza Glaze

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Coastal Carolina Univ.

Start Date

14-5-2016 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1225

Description

Constantinus Africanus (d. ante 1098/99), the first known translator to render Arabic medical literature into Latin, came from North Africa and eventually settled at the monastery of Montecassino under the famed abbot Desiderius (d. 1087). Despite the impact of his work, much remains to be investigated about the texts he produced and the larger revolution in western medicine he facilitated. This session, one of two, concerns medicine and the production of medical manuscripts as a mode of communication and activity that connected the region of the Beneventan script, with Montecassino its most prominent center, to its neighboring Muslim and Greek regions, but also to the rest of Latin Europe north of Rome.

-Richard Gyug

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 14th, 10:00 AM

Before/After Constantinus Africanus: Medicine in the Beneventan Zone and Beyond I

Schneider 1225

Constantinus Africanus (d. ante 1098/99), the first known translator to render Arabic medical literature into Latin, came from North Africa and eventually settled at the monastery of Montecassino under the famed abbot Desiderius (d. 1087). Despite the impact of his work, much remains to be investigated about the texts he produced and the larger revolution in western medicine he facilitated. This session, one of two, concerns medicine and the production of medical manuscripts as a mode of communication and activity that connected the region of the Beneventan script, with Montecassino its most prominent center, to its neighboring Muslim and Greek regions, but also to the rest of Latin Europe north of Rome.

-Richard Gyug