Session Title

Rhineland Partners in Twelfth-Century Discourses

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Divinity School, Univ. of Chicago

Organizer Name

Robert J. Porwoll

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Presider Name

Robert J. Porwoll

Paper Title 1

Honorius Augustodunensis: Remembering Creation in the Twelfth Century

Presenter 1 Name

Daniel Yingst

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Paper Title 2

"Merely Reading It": Hildegard's Theory of Chant in Letter 23 and the Privatization of the Divine Office

Presenter 2 Name

Mark Roosien

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Paper Title 3

Vision as Theological Critique: Elisabeth of Schönau and the Schoolmen

Presenter 3 Name

Matthew Vanderpoel

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Start Date

12-5-2016 10:00 AM

Session Location

Valley II Garneau Lounge

Description

This panel provides a forum to bring together disparate scholarship on important twelfth century figures from the geographical region of the Rhineland. Three promising papers will highlight three important figures: Daniel Yingst will take Honorius Augustodunensis' pedagogical project of mnemonic re-mapping of the student within a christianized cosmos to bear upon the larger twelfth century discourse on 'natura.' Mark Roosien will examine Hildegard of Bingen's theorization of liturgical music, specifically the singing of the Divine Office, as a necessary and irreplaceable feature of liturgy, despite the large twelfth century practices that appear to depreciate music and to set the Divine Office within increasingly individualized practices. Matthew Vanderpoel will offer a re-interpretation of Elizabeth as a mature theologian, blurring the neat distinction between scholastic and mystical theological discourses.

Robert Porwoll

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May 12th, 10:00 AM

Rhineland Partners in Twelfth-Century Discourses

Valley II Garneau Lounge

This panel provides a forum to bring together disparate scholarship on important twelfth century figures from the geographical region of the Rhineland. Three promising papers will highlight three important figures: Daniel Yingst will take Honorius Augustodunensis' pedagogical project of mnemonic re-mapping of the student within a christianized cosmos to bear upon the larger twelfth century discourse on 'natura.' Mark Roosien will examine Hildegard of Bingen's theorization of liturgical music, specifically the singing of the Divine Office, as a necessary and irreplaceable feature of liturgy, despite the large twelfth century practices that appear to depreciate music and to set the Divine Office within increasingly individualized practices. Matthew Vanderpoel will offer a re-interpretation of Elizabeth as a mature theologian, blurring the neat distinction between scholastic and mystical theological discourses.

Robert Porwoll