Session Title

Visualizing Medieval Connections: Network Analysis and Digital Mapping I

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Alabama Medieval Studies (ALMS)

Organizer Name

Kate M. Craig, Leanne Good

Organizer Affiliation

Auburn Univ., Univ. of South Alabama

Presider Name

Kate M. Craig

Paper Title 1

Power and Proximity: Mapping Late Tenth-Century Networks through Gerbert of Aurillac's Letters

Presenter 1 Name

Courtney DeMayo

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Heidelberg Univ.

Paper Title 2

Ubi est thesaurus tuus, ibi est et cor tuum: Spatial and Network Analysis of the Monastic Cartulary

Presenter 2 Name

Leland Renato Grigoli

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Brown Univ.

Paper Title 3

Mapping Saint Catherine's: Place, Space, and Identity in Medieval Avignon

Presenter 3 Name

Christine Axen

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Boston Univ.

Start Date

14-5-2016 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1125

Description

This session highlights emerging perspectives on what it meant to be connected in the Middle Ages, and how those connections shaped spatial and social identities. What moved in the medieval world (ideas, objects, people, stories, technology)? How did different rhythms of motion and patterns of circulation intersect with one another? How can medieval connections be visualized and represented, and what new impressions of the medieval world might we form by focusing on movement and interaction rather than stasis? The papers engage the methodological question of how to bring new digital approaches, such as social network analysis and digital mapping, to bear on this research.

Leanne Good

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 14th, 1:30 PM

Visualizing Medieval Connections: Network Analysis and Digital Mapping I

Schneider 1125

This session highlights emerging perspectives on what it meant to be connected in the Middle Ages, and how those connections shaped spatial and social identities. What moved in the medieval world (ideas, objects, people, stories, technology)? How did different rhythms of motion and patterns of circulation intersect with one another? How can medieval connections be visualized and represented, and what new impressions of the medieval world might we form by focusing on movement and interaction rather than stasis? The papers engage the methodological question of how to bring new digital approaches, such as social network analysis and digital mapping, to bear on this research.

Leanne Good