Session Title

The Long Lives of Medieval Objects, from Big to Small II: (Re)presentation

Sponsoring Organization(s)

AVISTA: The Association Villard de Honnecourt for the Interdisciplinary Study of Medieval Technology, Science, and Art

Organizer Name

Jennifer M. Feltman, Sarah Thompson

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of West Florida, Rochester Institute of Technology

Presider Name

Sarah Thompson

Paper Title 1

Resurrecting the Medieval Altar: Iberian Virgins on and off the Altar

Presenter 1 Name

Maeve O'Donnell-Morales

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Courtauld Institute of Art

Paper Title 2

Patronage, Censorship, and Digital Repatriation: Excavating Layers of History in the Carrow Psalter

Presenter 2 Name

Lynley Anne Herbert

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Walters Art Museum

Paper Title 3

The Parish Church of Notre-Dame de Louviers and the Production of Meaning in Late Gothic Architecture

Presenter 3 Name

Kyle G. Sweeney

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Rice Univ.

Start Date

14-5-2016 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1220

Description

Traditional histories often privilege the moment of an object’s origin, whether it be the design of a building, the production of a manuscript, or the creation of decorative arts, ritual or mundane. Yet medieval objects have long and expansive lives that defy the period and geographic boundaries set by academic disciplines. Many medieval objects have extended prehistories emerging from their sites and contexts of creation, and most medieval objects have undergone a variety of interventions and adaptations since coming into being. The lives of these objects have been further extended through historiography and digital media. In this, the second of three AVISTA sponsored sessions, papers consider how the representation or re-presentation of medieval objects has extended their lives.

Jennifer M. Feltman, Sarah Thompson

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May 14th, 1:30 PM

The Long Lives of Medieval Objects, from Big to Small II: (Re)presentation

Schneider 1220

Traditional histories often privilege the moment of an object’s origin, whether it be the design of a building, the production of a manuscript, or the creation of decorative arts, ritual or mundane. Yet medieval objects have long and expansive lives that defy the period and geographic boundaries set by academic disciplines. Many medieval objects have extended prehistories emerging from their sites and contexts of creation, and most medieval objects have undergone a variety of interventions and adaptations since coming into being. The lives of these objects have been further extended through historiography and digital media. In this, the second of three AVISTA sponsored sessions, papers consider how the representation or re-presentation of medieval objects has extended their lives.

Jennifer M. Feltman, Sarah Thompson