Session Title

C. S. Lewis and the Middle Ages II: Lewis and Medieval Philosophy/Theology

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for the Study of C. S. Lewis and Friends, Taylor Univ.

Organizer Name

Joe Ricke

Organizer Affiliation

Taylor Univ.

Presider Name

Edwin Woodruff Tait

Presider Affiliation

Christian History Magazine

Paper Title 1

Divine Love: Evaluating Eros in Lewis through Bonaventure and Coakley

Presenter 1 Name

Matthew Roberts

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Abilene Christian Univ.

Paper Title 2

Joining in the Great Dance: Stellar Ascents in C. S. Lewis's That Hideous Strength

Presenter 2 Name

N. E. H. Fayard

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Arkansas-Fayetteville

Paper Title 3

Dante's Medieval Angels in the Ransom Trilogy

Presenter 3 Name

Marsha Daigle-Williamson

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Spring Arbor Univ.

Paper Title 4

C. S. Lewis and Medieval Incarnationalist Theology

Presenter 4 Name

Chris Armstrong

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Wheaton College

Start Date

14-5-2016 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1225

Description

In his scholarship, his religious writing, and his creative works, C. S. Lewis maintained a robust dialogue with medieval philosophers and theologians such as Boethius, Aquinas, the author of the Theological Germanica, Bernardus Sylvestris, and others. In fact, in one of his letters he described himself simply as "a medieval scholar." This session includes papers which describe and reflect on that dialogue.

Joe M. Ricke

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May 14th, 1:30 PM

C. S. Lewis and the Middle Ages II: Lewis and Medieval Philosophy/Theology

Schneider 1225

In his scholarship, his religious writing, and his creative works, C. S. Lewis maintained a robust dialogue with medieval philosophers and theologians such as Boethius, Aquinas, the author of the Theological Germanica, Bernardus Sylvestris, and others. In fact, in one of his letters he described himself simply as "a medieval scholar." This session includes papers which describe and reflect on that dialogue.

Joe M. Ricke