Session Title

A Session of Ice and Fire: Medievalism in the Game of Thrones Franchise

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Tales after Tolkien Society

Organizer Name

Helen Young

Organizer Affiliation

La Trobe Univ.

Presider Name

Geoffrey B. Elliott

Presider Affiliation

Oklahoma State Univ.

Paper Title 1

Forging and Reforging Valyrian Steel: The Role of Arthurian Sword Motifs in George R .R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire

Presenter 1 Name

Alexandra Garner

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Bowling Green State Univ.

Paper Title 2

Peaceweaving in Westeros

Presenter 2 Name

Carol Parrish Jamison

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Armstrong State Univ.

Paper Title 3

Dragons, Alliances, Power, and Gold: Disruptor Beam's Game of Thrones Ascent

Presenter 3 Name

Shiloh R. Carroll

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Tennessee State Univ.

Start Date

14-5-2016 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1280

Description

The multimedia franchise built around George R. R. Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire" novels is the most prominent example of medievalism in the world today. It generates not only a vast audience, but a significant level of engagement with medieval history and culture through commentary and discussion. Much of the discussion is concerned with the 'authenticity' of the way in which the Middle Ages are represented - as violent, bloody, and brutal - and this makes the franchise of particular interest to scholars of the Middle Ages because the franchise actively shapes what audiences believe about history. This session includes papers which focus on medievalist aspects of Martin's novels, and on one of the many games derived from them.

Helen Young

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May 14th, 1:30 PM

A Session of Ice and Fire: Medievalism in the Game of Thrones Franchise

Schneider 1280

The multimedia franchise built around George R. R. Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire" novels is the most prominent example of medievalism in the world today. It generates not only a vast audience, but a significant level of engagement with medieval history and culture through commentary and discussion. Much of the discussion is concerned with the 'authenticity' of the way in which the Middle Ages are represented - as violent, bloody, and brutal - and this makes the franchise of particular interest to scholars of the Middle Ages because the franchise actively shapes what audiences believe about history. This session includes papers which focus on medievalist aspects of Martin's novels, and on one of the many games derived from them.

Helen Young