Session Title

Medieval Women Authors as Collaborators: Negotiating Authority and Authorship for Writers and Readers

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, St. Louis Univ.

Organizer Name

Cait Stevenson

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Presider Name

Kathleen Llewellyn

Presider Affiliation

St. Louis Univ.

Paper Title 1

Beyond Patronage: The Case for Queenly Co-Authorship of the Castilan Royal Chronicles

Presenter 1 Name

Janice North

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Arkansas-Fayetteville

Paper Title 2

The Letters of Margaret Paston: Are They Collaborative Works and How

Presenter 2 Name

Osamu Ohara

Presenter 2 Affiliation

School of Medicine, Jikei Univ.

Paper Title 3

Let's Build a Saint: Writing the Contested Sanctity of Magdalena Beutler

Presenter 3 Name

Cait Stevenson

Start Date

14-5-2016 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1345

Description

Texts by and about medieval women were neither written nor read in isolation. This session will help expand our understanding of the creative vibrancy of medieval women and their texts by viewing the works and their authors as participants in an intellectual, temporal and financial economy of collaboration. We invite papers that explore and broaden our understanding of different processes of collaboration and their impact on the texts they produced. In addition to questions surrounding the process of composition, we will examine how collaborative textual production affected medieval readers’ understanding of the works and their authors. Overall, this panel will shed light on dimensions of authority and transmission of knowledge as well as increasing our understanding of medieval women operating in their world.

Teresa E. Harvey

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May 14th, 1:30 PM

Medieval Women Authors as Collaborators: Negotiating Authority and Authorship for Writers and Readers

Schneider 1345

Texts by and about medieval women were neither written nor read in isolation. This session will help expand our understanding of the creative vibrancy of medieval women and their texts by viewing the works and their authors as participants in an intellectual, temporal and financial economy of collaboration. We invite papers that explore and broaden our understanding of different processes of collaboration and their impact on the texts they produced. In addition to questions surrounding the process of composition, we will examine how collaborative textual production affected medieval readers’ understanding of the works and their authors. Overall, this panel will shed light on dimensions of authority and transmission of knowledge as well as increasing our understanding of medieval women operating in their world.

Teresa E. Harvey