Session Title

Ordering Matter: Hierarchies of Material and Medium in Medieval Art

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Joseph Salvatore Ackley, Adam R. Stead

Organizer Affiliation

Columbia Univ., Western Univ.

Presider Name

Joseph Salvatore Ackley, Adam R. Stead

Paper Title 1

"Between Angels and Men": The Status of Engraving

Presenter 1 Name

Megan C. McNamee

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Paper Title 2

Vibrant Treasure: Material Agency in the Treasury Collection of San Marco in Venice

Presenter 2 Name

Mark H. Summers

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison

Paper Title 3

Painting the Sculptural Body on Trecento Crosses

Presenter 3 Name

Karl Whittington

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Ohio State Univ.

Start Date

14-5-2016 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 208

Description

Questions of the significance of materials now occupy a central place within medieval art history. Within this material turn, attention has generally been centered on the importance and meaning of individual materials, particularly luxury materials, such as gold, silver, ivory, and gemstones. But how were these—and other—materials evaluated relative to each other? That is to say, to what extent did material hierarchies obtain, both in theory and in (artistic) practice? This session investigates hierarchies of materials and media in medieval art from Late Antiquity through the end of the fourteenth century. It seeks to build upon the burgeoning body of work on medieval materiality and to engage recent interrogations of object ontology and the relationships between surface and substrate, and between substance and appearance.

Adam R. Stead

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May 14th, 1:30 PM

Ordering Matter: Hierarchies of Material and Medium in Medieval Art

Bernhard 208

Questions of the significance of materials now occupy a central place within medieval art history. Within this material turn, attention has generally been centered on the importance and meaning of individual materials, particularly luxury materials, such as gold, silver, ivory, and gemstones. But how were these—and other—materials evaluated relative to each other? That is to say, to what extent did material hierarchies obtain, both in theory and in (artistic) practice? This session investigates hierarchies of materials and media in medieval art from Late Antiquity through the end of the fourteenth century. It seeks to build upon the burgeoning body of work on medieval materiality and to engage recent interrogations of object ontology and the relationships between surface and substrate, and between substance and appearance.

Adam R. Stead