Session Title

Digital Manuscripts: Engaging the Public(s)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Stanford Univ.

Organizer Name

Fiona Griffiths

Organizer Affiliation

Stanford Univ.

Presider Name

Benjamin L. Albritton

Presider Affiliation

Stanford Univ.

Paper Title 1

Digging Deeper with Online Communities

Presenter 1 Name

Kenneth S. Ligda, Jonathan Quick

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Stanford Univ., Stanford Univ.

Paper Title 2

A Twitter Account on the Fly: Medieval Manuscripts (et Cetera) and Outreach

Presenter 2 Name

Katharine C. Chandler

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Free Library of Philadelphia

Paper Title 3

I Tweet the Fall of Princes and Kings: @MonkofBury, Digital Manuscripts, and Public Engagement in Medieval Studies

Presenter 3 Name

Bridget Whearty

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Binghamton Univ.

Paper Title 4

Digital Manuscripts and Social Media: Problems and Possibilities

Presenter 4 Name

Erik Kwakkel

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. Leiden

Start Date

14-5-2016 3:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1005

Description

Over the last five to ten years, we have reached an inflection point with the abundance of available digital images of medieval manuscripts: more material is available online than has ever been available to scholarship in the past. Through library websites, social media, and online learning, medieval content can now reach audiences that might never have been exposed to it. This situation can lead to anxiety about how manuscript content is represented online (questions of attribution and context abound), but also holds the potential to invite new publics into engagement directly with manuscripts. Twitter is rife with medieval marginalia; online courses on book history, like those recently sponsored by Stanford and Harvard, engage thousands of students worldwide; and active bloggers can bring general audiences into discussions of topics that fall outside of traditional publishing paradigms. This session will invite presentations that highlight outreach and engagement with both traditional (ie. academic) and non-traditional publics, and will encourage discussion of the role of the digital in raising the levels of interest and awareness of the medieval while also highlighting the responsibility of medievalists to help provide a context for the many disembodied images proliferating online.

Benjamin Albritton

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May 14th, 3:30 PM

Digital Manuscripts: Engaging the Public(s)

Fetzer 1005

Over the last five to ten years, we have reached an inflection point with the abundance of available digital images of medieval manuscripts: more material is available online than has ever been available to scholarship in the past. Through library websites, social media, and online learning, medieval content can now reach audiences that might never have been exposed to it. This situation can lead to anxiety about how manuscript content is represented online (questions of attribution and context abound), but also holds the potential to invite new publics into engagement directly with manuscripts. Twitter is rife with medieval marginalia; online courses on book history, like those recently sponsored by Stanford and Harvard, engage thousands of students worldwide; and active bloggers can bring general audiences into discussions of topics that fall outside of traditional publishing paradigms. This session will invite presentations that highlight outreach and engagement with both traditional (ie. academic) and non-traditional publics, and will encourage discussion of the role of the digital in raising the levels of interest and awareness of the medieval while also highlighting the responsibility of medievalists to help provide a context for the many disembodied images proliferating online.

Benjamin Albritton