Session Title

Sidneian Networks: Medieval to Post-modern

Sponsoring Organization(s)

International Sidney Society

Organizer Name

Nandra Perry

Organizer Affiliation

Texas A&M Univ.

Presider Name

Ilona Bell

Presider Affiliation

Williams College

Paper Title 1

Liberating Astrophel: Nashe's Preface as a Reader's Response

Presenter 1 Name

Elisabeth Chaghafi

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen

Paper Title 2

George Herbert's "Sighes and Grones": A Sidneian Penitential Psalm?

Presenter 2 Name

Patricia H. Ward

Presenter 2 Affiliation

College of Charleston

Paper Title 3

Poetics and Epistemology in Philip Sidney's Defense of Poetry and Astrophil and Stella, or, How Sidney Read His Cavendish?

Presenter 3 Name

Nicole Hagstrom-Schmidt

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Texas A&M Univ.

Start Date

14-5-2016 3:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1060

Description

This conference session seeks to expand the traditional circumference of the “Sidney Circle” centered on the literary legacies of Philip and Mary Sidney. Work in the digital humanities, recent studies of manuscript circulation, revised understandings of authorship, and the ongoing work of recovering women’s writing all contribute to current work re-imagining literary networks. We invite proposals that consider literary networks, from the vantages of recent digital work, editorial practice, the circulation of texts, patronage, and authorship. In keeping with the overall theme of the conference, we particularly encourage papers that focus on the engagement of Sidneian poetics with medieval and “medievalizing” sources, contemporaries, and imitators.

Nandra L. Perry

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May 14th, 3:30 PM

Sidneian Networks: Medieval to Post-modern

Fetzer 1060

This conference session seeks to expand the traditional circumference of the “Sidney Circle” centered on the literary legacies of Philip and Mary Sidney. Work in the digital humanities, recent studies of manuscript circulation, revised understandings of authorship, and the ongoing work of recovering women’s writing all contribute to current work re-imagining literary networks. We invite proposals that consider literary networks, from the vantages of recent digital work, editorial practice, the circulation of texts, patronage, and authorship. In keeping with the overall theme of the conference, we particularly encourage papers that focus on the engagement of Sidneian poetics with medieval and “medievalizing” sources, contemporaries, and imitators.

Nandra L. Perry