Session Title

Visualizing Medieval Connections: Network Analysis and Digital Mapping II

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Alabama Medieval Studies (ALMS)

Organizer Name

Kate M. Craig, Leanne Good

Organizer Affiliation

Auburn Univ., Univ. of South Alabama

Presider Name

Leanne Good

Paper Title 1

Commodity Flows: Combining Least Cost Path and Network Analysis Techniques for Modeling Early Medieval Trade Relations in East Central Europe

Presenter 1 Name

Donat Wehner

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Christian-Albrechts-Univ. zu Kiel

Paper Title 2

Exploring Economic Networks in the Medieval Peloponnese, Greece (Eleventh-Twelfth Centuries)

Presenter 2 Name

Katerina Ragkou

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. zu Köln

Paper Title 3

Grassroots Heresy: Towards Social Mapping of German Waldensian Communities, 1390-1400

Presenter 3 Name

Eugene Smelyansky

Presenter 3 Affiliation

St. Thomas Univ.

Start Date

14-5-2016 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1130

Description

This session highlights emerging perspectives on what it meant to be connected in the Middle Ages, and how those connections shaped spatial and social identities. What moved in the medieval world (ideas, objects, people, stories, technology)? How did different rhythms of motion and patterns of circulation intersect with one another? How can medieval connections be visualized and represented, and what new impressions of the medieval world might we form by focusing on movement and interaction rather than stasis? The papers engage the methodological question of how to bring new digital approaches, such as social network analysis and digital mapping, to bear on this research.

Leanne Good

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May 14th, 3:30 PM

Visualizing Medieval Connections: Network Analysis and Digital Mapping II

Schneider 1130

This session highlights emerging perspectives on what it meant to be connected in the Middle Ages, and how those connections shaped spatial and social identities. What moved in the medieval world (ideas, objects, people, stories, technology)? How did different rhythms of motion and patterns of circulation intersect with one another? How can medieval connections be visualized and represented, and what new impressions of the medieval world might we form by focusing on movement and interaction rather than stasis? The papers engage the methodological question of how to bring new digital approaches, such as social network analysis and digital mapping, to bear on this research.

Leanne Good