Session Title

The Long Lives of Medieval Objects, from Big to Small III: Reception

Sponsoring Organization(s)

AVISTA: The Association Villard de Honnecourt for the Interdisciplinary Study of Medieval Technology, Science, and Art

Organizer Name

Jennifer M. Feltman, Sarah Thompson

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of West Florida, Rochester Institute of Technology

Presider Name

Jennifer M. Feltman

Paper Title 1

The Victory Cross Redux: Politics and Medieval Art in the Aftermath of the Spanish Civil War

Presenter 1 Name

Matilde Mateo

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Syracuse Univ.

Paper Title 2

The Magdeburger Reiter in Modern Germany

Presenter 2 Name

William Diebold

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Reed College

Paper Title 3

The Fate of the Bronze Doors of Benevento Cathedral during and after World War II

Presenter 3 Name

Cathleen Hoeniger

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Queen's Univ. Kingston

Start Date

14-5-2016 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1220

Description

Traditional histories often privilege the moment of an object’s origin, whether it be the design of a building, the production of a manuscript, or the creation of decorative arts, ritual or mundane. Yet medieval objects have long and expansive lives that defy the period and geographic boundaries set by academic disciplines. Many medieval objects have extended prehistories emerging from their sites and contexts of creation, and most medieval objects have undergone a variety of interventions and adaptations since coming into being. The lives of these objects have been further extended through historiography and digital media. In this, the third of three AVISTA sponsored sessions, the reception of medieval objects in later periods is considered.

Jennifer M. Feltman, Sarah Thompson

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May 14th, 3:30 PM

The Long Lives of Medieval Objects, from Big to Small III: Reception

Schneider 1220

Traditional histories often privilege the moment of an object’s origin, whether it be the design of a building, the production of a manuscript, or the creation of decorative arts, ritual or mundane. Yet medieval objects have long and expansive lives that defy the period and geographic boundaries set by academic disciplines. Many medieval objects have extended prehistories emerging from their sites and contexts of creation, and most medieval objects have undergone a variety of interventions and adaptations since coming into being. The lives of these objects have been further extended through historiography and digital media. In this, the third of three AVISTA sponsored sessions, the reception of medieval objects in later periods is considered.

Jennifer M. Feltman, Sarah Thompson