Session Title

Romance Geographies and Geographic Literacies: Theoretical and Practical Concerns in Mapping Medieval Texts (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Studies, Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland

Organizer Name

John A. Geck

Organizer Affiliation

Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland

Presider Name

John A. Geck

Paper Title 1

Mapping Multitextual Geographies in Bevis of Hampton

Presenter 1 Name

Paul A. Broyles

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Virginia

Paper Title 2

Where in the Francia Is That? Theory and Practice of "Mapping" Medieval Miracle Literature

Presenter 2 Name

Sandy Carpenter

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 3

Geographic Literacies and Spatial Poetics in the Alliterative Morte Arthure

Presenter 3 Name

Patricia A. Price

Presenter 3 Affiliation

California State Univ.-San Marcos

Paper Title 4

To Map or Not to Map: Thinking through the Limitations of Mapping Romance

Presenter 4 Name

Robert Allen Rouse

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of British Columbia

Start Date

14-5-2016 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1330

Description

In exploring the use of space and place in medieval texts, scholars engaged in mapping projects find themselves facing a number of concerns, both theoretical (e.g., What does a place name mean to a medieval author or reader? Can we map this medieval sense of place on or over our modern, Cartesian-derived, projection of the world?) and the practical (How can this data be presented? Via a single, static map, or a more functional, but complex solution such as a Geographic Information System [GIS]?)

This round table will explore the benefits (and threats) of mapping literary spaces in Middle English romances and miracle stories. Place and space figure largely in these related genres, wherein the protagonists often undertake wide-ranging journeys across much of the known world.

John A. Geck

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May 14th, 3:30 PM

Romance Geographies and Geographic Literacies: Theoretical and Practical Concerns in Mapping Medieval Texts (A Roundtable)

Schneider 1330

In exploring the use of space and place in medieval texts, scholars engaged in mapping projects find themselves facing a number of concerns, both theoretical (e.g., What does a place name mean to a medieval author or reader? Can we map this medieval sense of place on or over our modern, Cartesian-derived, projection of the world?) and the practical (How can this data be presented? Via a single, static map, or a more functional, but complex solution such as a Geographic Information System [GIS]?)

This round table will explore the benefits (and threats) of mapping literary spaces in Middle English romances and miracle stories. Place and space figure largely in these related genres, wherein the protagonists often undertake wide-ranging journeys across much of the known world.

John A. Geck