Session Title

Jetpack Cats and Penis Trees: An Oral-Traditional Approach to Humor in Medieval Texts

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Rebecca M. Mouser, Claire Schmidt

Organizer Affiliation

Missouri Southern State Univ., Missouri Valley College

Presider Name

Rebecca M. Mouser

Paper Title 1

Oral-Traditional Theory and the Audience for Middle English Romance

Presenter 1 Name

Paul D. Gaffney

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Hiram College

Paper Title 2

Nuns and Anthropomorphic Penis Beasts in Fifteenth-Century Germany

Presenter 2 Name

Rabia Gregory

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Missouri-Columbia

Paper Title 3

Tendentious Anglo-Saxon Humor and the Exeter Book Riddles

Presenter 3 Name

Claire Schmidt

Start Date

15-5-2016 8:30 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 1045

Description

Oral-traditional theory informs many aspects of medieval texts, from production and aesthetics to structure and content. It is the purpose of this session to explore the intersections of medieval literature and art, oral-traditional theory, and humor theory. Few categories of human expressive culture are at once so categorically structured and yet so culturally transgressive as humor. Successfully deployed humor depends on a mutually agreed-upon and contextually-based understanding between the audience and the performer. Oral-traditional theory brings much to the study of medieval humor and provides a toolbox for careful exploration of this aspect of literature and art. This session allows for interaction between scholars from multiple fields such as literature, history, psychology, religion, art history and archeology, and folklore.

Rebecca M. Mouser

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May 15th, 8:30 AM

Jetpack Cats and Penis Trees: An Oral-Traditional Approach to Humor in Medieval Texts

Fetzer 1045

Oral-traditional theory informs many aspects of medieval texts, from production and aesthetics to structure and content. It is the purpose of this session to explore the intersections of medieval literature and art, oral-traditional theory, and humor theory. Few categories of human expressive culture are at once so categorically structured and yet so culturally transgressive as humor. Successfully deployed humor depends on a mutually agreed-upon and contextually-based understanding between the audience and the performer. Oral-traditional theory brings much to the study of medieval humor and provides a toolbox for careful exploration of this aspect of literature and art. This session allows for interaction between scholars from multiple fields such as literature, history, psychology, religion, art history and archeology, and folklore.

Rebecca M. Mouser