Session Title

The Pleasure of the Unpredictable in Middle English Narrative

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Leigh Smith

Organizer Affiliation

East Stroudsburg Univ.

Presider Name

Leigh Smith

Paper Title 1

Story, Legend, or Life? Negotiating Genres in The Clerk's Tale

Presenter 1 Name

Marc Guidry

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Stephen F. Austin State Univ.

Paper Title 2

Surprise and Delight as Mystical Practices in Julian of Norwich

Presenter 2 Name

Maria L. C. Prozesky

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Pretoria

Paper Title 3

Friendship, Sodomy, and Incest: Chaucer's Unpredictable Pandarus

Presenter 3 Name

Richard Sévère

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Centenary College

Paper Title 4

What's Neuroscience Got to Do, Got to Do with It? What's Love but a Rhetorical Emotion in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

Presenter 4 Name

Scott D. Troyan

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison

Start Date

15-5-2016 8:30 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 2030

Description

Middle English authors constantly employ and break the patterns set by their Continental models and creating expectations in their readers (for example, by presenting the signifiers of a particular genre) and then surprising them by refusing to conform to those expectations. This session will explore to what degree they do so deliberately for the pleasure of their audiences and to what degree this apparent tendency is a modern construct.

Leigh Smith

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May 15th, 8:30 AM

The Pleasure of the Unpredictable in Middle English Narrative

Fetzer 2030

Middle English authors constantly employ and break the patterns set by their Continental models and creating expectations in their readers (for example, by presenting the signifiers of a particular genre) and then surprising them by refusing to conform to those expectations. This session will explore to what degree they do so deliberately for the pleasure of their audiences and to what degree this apparent tendency is a modern construct.

Leigh Smith