Session Title

The Archaeology of Medieval Europe I: Non-monetary Uses of Coins

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Univ. of Florida

Organizer Name

Florin Curta

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Florida

Presider Name

Alan M. Stahl

Presider Affiliation

Princeton Univ.

Paper Title 1

The Erotics of Marriage Jewelry in Byzantine Egypt

Presenter 1 Name

Ashley Elizabeth Jones

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Florida

Paper Title 2

Roots of Germanic Coinage

Presenter 2 Name

Aleksander Bursche

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. Warszawski

Paper Title 3

Money and "Barbarians": Enhancing Social Prestige on Byzantium's Northern Frontier (Sixth-Seventh Centuries)

Presenter 3 Name

Andrei Gandila

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Alabama-Huntsville

Start Date

15-5-2016 8:30 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1140

Description

The explosion of studies in medieval numismatics over the last 50 years or so has shed a new light on a number of phenomena at the intersection of economics and social, or even ritual behavior. Is a coin found within or next to the skeleton skull in a medieval burial an instrument of exchange or a symbol for a set of beliefs to which scholars have only limited access, because of the lack of contextual information from the written sources? How are coins perforated and worn as pendants to be interpreted, and what criteria applied in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages for the selection of particular coins to be worn as pendants? Finally, what insights can one get into the role that images, such as ruler portraits, inscribed on coins had in Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages through the examination of coins turned into jewels? Above all, this session attempts to answer some of those questions through a number of key case studies.

Florin Curta

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 15th, 8:30 AM

The Archaeology of Medieval Europe I: Non-monetary Uses of Coins

Schneider 1140

The explosion of studies in medieval numismatics over the last 50 years or so has shed a new light on a number of phenomena at the intersection of economics and social, or even ritual behavior. Is a coin found within or next to the skeleton skull in a medieval burial an instrument of exchange or a symbol for a set of beliefs to which scholars have only limited access, because of the lack of contextual information from the written sources? How are coins perforated and worn as pendants to be interpreted, and what criteria applied in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages for the selection of particular coins to be worn as pendants? Finally, what insights can one get into the role that images, such as ruler portraits, inscribed on coins had in Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages through the examination of coins turned into jewels? Above all, this session attempts to answer some of those questions through a number of key case studies.

Florin Curta