Session Title

Science, Nature, and Scholarship in the Early Middle Ages

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Dept. of Theology and Religion, Durham Univ.

Organizer Name

Helen Foxhall Forbes

Organizer Affiliation

Durham Univ.

Presider Name

Guy Halsall

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of York

Paper Title 1

Thunderbolts and Lightning Really Aren't That Frightening: Reporting the Weather in Carolingian Annals

Presenter 1 Name

Julie A. Hofmann

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Shenandoah Univ.

Paper Title 2

Thinking about Theology and Science in the Insular World

Presenter 2 Name

Helen Foxhall Forbes

Start Date

15-5-2016 8:30 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 211

Description

This session seeks to explore how science and nature were studied and discussed in early medieval scholarship with a view to exploring how medieval thinkers responded to the natural world, and how they sought to understand and interpret natural phenomena. In particular, a key focus of this session will be evidence and how it was used, understood and interpreted by scholars in the early Middle Ages. It is often assumed that early medieval scholars relied only on Scripture (and some inherited classical learning) for their interpretations of the natural world, but recent work has demonstrated both the importance of evidence drawn from observation in the early middle ages and the range of different types of questions and methods that early medieval scholars used. This session will offer an opportunity to reconsider the place of early medieval science – often thought (incorrectly!) to be almost non-existent – and its relationship to contemporary scholarship and to the transmission of knowledge and ideas.

Helen G. Foxhall Forbes

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May 15th, 8:30 AM

Science, Nature, and Scholarship in the Early Middle Ages

Bernhard 211

This session seeks to explore how science and nature were studied and discussed in early medieval scholarship with a view to exploring how medieval thinkers responded to the natural world, and how they sought to understand and interpret natural phenomena. In particular, a key focus of this session will be evidence and how it was used, understood and interpreted by scholars in the early Middle Ages. It is often assumed that early medieval scholars relied only on Scripture (and some inherited classical learning) for their interpretations of the natural world, but recent work has demonstrated both the importance of evidence drawn from observation in the early middle ages and the range of different types of questions and methods that early medieval scholars used. This session will offer an opportunity to reconsider the place of early medieval science – often thought (incorrectly!) to be almost non-existent – and its relationship to contemporary scholarship and to the transmission of knowledge and ideas.

Helen G. Foxhall Forbes