Session Title

APRICOT: A Pedagogical Hub for Medieval Studies (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Ece Turnator

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Texas-Austin

Presider Name

Ece Turnator

Paper Title 1

APRICOT: Overview and Philosophy

Presenter 1 Name

Tamsyn Rose-Steel

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Johns Hopkins Univ.

Paper Title 2

Repurposing Omeka

Presenter 2 Name

Alexandra Bolintineanu

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 3

Giving Credit for Working: Metrics and Feedback

Presenter 3 Name

Bridget Whearty

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Binghamton Univ.

Paper Title 4

Functionality and Design

Presenter 4 Name

Matthew Evan Davis

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Start Date

15-5-2016 10:30 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 2016

Description

This roundtable session will introduce and discuss APRICOT (A Peer-Reviewed Interdisciplinary Collection of Objects for Teaching), a pedagogical hub for medieval and early modern studies, designed to benefit both students and instructors. It is intended an open-access site for developing, distributing and peer-reviewing interdisciplinary teaching objects, especially uses of digital technologies, tools, and methods. Alongside providing a hub for digital medieval and early modern teaching resources, an equally-powerful motivation is creating a systematic process for tracking and assessing teaching resources, providing participants with accessible metrics useful for job applications and tenure committees. A significant function of our site is tracking user-uploaded material, user reviews of this material and its adaptation by other practitioners.

Tamsyn Rose-Steel

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May 15th, 10:30 AM

APRICOT: A Pedagogical Hub for Medieval Studies (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 2016

This roundtable session will introduce and discuss APRICOT (A Peer-Reviewed Interdisciplinary Collection of Objects for Teaching), a pedagogical hub for medieval and early modern studies, designed to benefit both students and instructors. It is intended an open-access site for developing, distributing and peer-reviewing interdisciplinary teaching objects, especially uses of digital technologies, tools, and methods. Alongside providing a hub for digital medieval and early modern teaching resources, an equally-powerful motivation is creating a systematic process for tracking and assessing teaching resources, providing participants with accessible metrics useful for job applications and tenure committees. A significant function of our site is tracking user-uploaded material, user reviews of this material and its adaptation by other practitioners.

Tamsyn Rose-Steel