Session Title

The Archaeology of Medieval Europe II: Medieval Colonization

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Univ. of Florida

Organizer Name

Florin Curta

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Florida

Presider Name

Andrzej Kompa

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Łódź

Paper Title 1

The "German Colonization" on the Southeastern Frontier of Medieval Hungary: An Archaeological Perspective

Presenter 1 Name

Maria Emilia Ţiplic

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Institute for Research in Social Sciences and Humanities, Sibiu

Paper Title 2

Networks of Colonialism: The Hansa in Northeastern Europe

Presenter 2 Name

Visa Immonen, Joonas Kinnunen

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Turun Yliopisto, Turun Yliopisto

Paper Title 3

From Muslim Almunias to Carthusian Domain: Suburban Landscapes of Northern Granada (Fourteenth-Seventeenth Centuries)

Presenter 3 Name

Guillermo Garcia-Contreras Ruiz

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Reading

Paper Title 4

Colonizing the North: Interactions between Sami and non-Sami in Seventeenth-Century Sapmi (Lapland)

Presenter 4 Name

Magdalena Naum

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Oulun Yliopisto

Start Date

15-5-2016 10:30 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1140

Description

Archaeology has not contributed much to the debate surrounding the question of the medieval colonization of the lands in East Central and Southeastern Europe (a topic infamously known as "Drang nach Osten"). The first settlement established by immigrants from German-speaking areas in Moravia and Transylvania are known to have opened vast areas for cultivation, but, at the same time, to have pushed the medieval frontiers of Bohemia and Hungary. In northeastern Europe, the presence of the German-speaking settlers is directly associated with the radical economic transformations brought by the Hansa. A transformation of the landscape is also evident in the colonization of the newly-conquered lands of the emirate of Granada, after ca. 1500, by settlers from Castile and Aragon. The relations between natives and colonists have rarely explored archaeologically, except in the case of Lapland. The session offers a number of case studies aiming at answering some of the key questions raised by the archaeology of colonization.

Florin curta

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May 15th, 10:30 AM

The Archaeology of Medieval Europe II: Medieval Colonization

Schneider 1140

Archaeology has not contributed much to the debate surrounding the question of the medieval colonization of the lands in East Central and Southeastern Europe (a topic infamously known as "Drang nach Osten"). The first settlement established by immigrants from German-speaking areas in Moravia and Transylvania are known to have opened vast areas for cultivation, but, at the same time, to have pushed the medieval frontiers of Bohemia and Hungary. In northeastern Europe, the presence of the German-speaking settlers is directly associated with the radical economic transformations brought by the Hansa. A transformation of the landscape is also evident in the colonization of the newly-conquered lands of the emirate of Granada, after ca. 1500, by settlers from Castile and Aragon. The relations between natives and colonists have rarely explored archaeologically, except in the case of Lapland. The session offers a number of case studies aiming at answering some of the key questions raised by the archaeology of colonization.

Florin curta