Session Title

Women and the Law in Britain and Ireland, 1300-1500

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea Univ.

Organizer Name

Sparky Booker

Organizer Affiliation

Swansea Univ.

Presider Name

Liz Herbert McAvoy

Presider Affiliation

Swansea Univ.

Paper Title 1

Catching Fire: Female Arsonists and Formal Justice in Late Medieval Scotland

Presenter 1 Name

Chelsea Hartlen

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Guelph

Paper Title 2

A Witch's Defense: Women's Rights and Conflicts between Canon and Common Law in the Kilkenny Witch Trial of 1324

Presenter 2 Name

Maeve B. Callan

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Simpson College

Paper Title 3

"She wept and felt great sorrow": Marital Disputes in the Ecclesiastical Courts of Late Medieval Ireland

Presenter 3 Name

Sparky Booker

Paper Title 4

"Lamentably Compleyneth": Female Petitioners and the Quest for Justice in Late Medieval Wales

Presenter 4 Name

Deborah Youngs

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Swansea Univ.

Start Date

15-5-2016 10:30 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1155

Description

Our panel brings together scholars from gender and legal historical backgrounds to explore women's access to legal redress in late medieval Britain and Ireland. It focuses particularly on the experiences of women from geographic peripheries, and addresses a number of important questions: how did societal expectations of women influence their legal outcomes; how did different legal frameworks, particularly canon and common law, interact with one another in disputes that involved women; and finally, what legal strategies did women use in these different courts in order to achieve their desired aims.

Sparky Booker

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May 15th, 10:30 AM

Women and the Law in Britain and Ireland, 1300-1500

Schneider 1155

Our panel brings together scholars from gender and legal historical backgrounds to explore women's access to legal redress in late medieval Britain and Ireland. It focuses particularly on the experiences of women from geographic peripheries, and addresses a number of important questions: how did societal expectations of women influence their legal outcomes; how did different legal frameworks, particularly canon and common law, interact with one another in disputes that involved women; and finally, what legal strategies did women use in these different courts in order to achieve their desired aims.

Sparky Booker