Session Title

Late Old English Verse

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Eric Weiskott

Organizer Affiliation

Boston College

Presider Name

Dylan Wilkerson

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 1

"The Grave" as a Paradoxical Encomium

Presenter 1 Name

Richard Ford Burley

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Boston College

Paper Title 2

What Is Late about Late Old English Meter?

Presenter 2 Name

Geoffrey Richard Russom

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Brown Univ.

Paper Title 3

Found You! Old English Homiletics and/in the Early Middle English Poema Morale

Presenter 3 Name

Carla María Thomas

Presenter 3 Affiliation

New York Univ.

Start Date

15-5-2016 10:30 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 205

Description

This session focuses on Old English poetry datable to between c. 950 and 1150. Many of these poems are embedded in late annals in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle; most of them were snubbed by being excluded from the standard edition of Old English verse, the Anglo-Saxon Poetic Records (Columbia Univ. Press, 1931-53). As a result, late Old English poems as a group are severely understudied. Indeed, because Old English verse is written out in unlineated text blocks in manuscript, and because most theories of Old English meter are based on putatively pre-950 poems like Beowulf, scholars disagree about the exact number of extant late Old English poems. As recently as 2007, Thomas Bredehoft could identify an entirely new, never-before-discussed poem. This session explores what the study of short, late, and (often) topical Old English poems might contribute to critical conceptions of English literary culture and literary history.

The three papers in this session discuss late Old English verse as a moment in the history of an underappreciated poetic genre; as a juncture in metrical history; and as a repository for source study of late twelfth-century English poetry. The first and third papers also extend the chronological scope of the session by connecting late Old English literature to late twelfth-century English poetry sometimes categorized (by modern scholars) as 'Early Middle English verse.'

Eric Weiskott

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May 15th, 10:30 AM

Late Old English Verse

Bernhard 205

This session focuses on Old English poetry datable to between c. 950 and 1150. Many of these poems are embedded in late annals in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle; most of them were snubbed by being excluded from the standard edition of Old English verse, the Anglo-Saxon Poetic Records (Columbia Univ. Press, 1931-53). As a result, late Old English poems as a group are severely understudied. Indeed, because Old English verse is written out in unlineated text blocks in manuscript, and because most theories of Old English meter are based on putatively pre-950 poems like Beowulf, scholars disagree about the exact number of extant late Old English poems. As recently as 2007, Thomas Bredehoft could identify an entirely new, never-before-discussed poem. This session explores what the study of short, late, and (often) topical Old English poems might contribute to critical conceptions of English literary culture and literary history.

The three papers in this session discuss late Old English verse as a moment in the history of an underappreciated poetic genre; as a juncture in metrical history; and as a repository for source study of late twelfth-century English poetry. The first and third papers also extend the chronological scope of the session by connecting late Old English literature to late twelfth-century English poetry sometimes categorized (by modern scholars) as 'Early Middle English verse.'

Eric Weiskott