Session Title

Sensory Reflections: Traces of Experience in Medieval Artifacts II

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Stanford Univ.

Organizer Name

Fiona Griffiths, Kathryn Starkey

Organizer Affiliation

Stanford Univ., Stanford Univ.

Presider Name

Kathryn Starkey

Paper Title 1

Reading Effects: The Sensory Experience of Lectio at Villers

Presenter 1 Name

Sara Ritchey

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Louisiana-Lafayette

Paper Title 2

Birds in Hand: Micro-books and the Devotional Experience, 1270-1517

Presenter 2 Name

Alexa K. Sand

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Utah State Univ.

Start Date

15-5-2016 10:30 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 211

Description

The rich potential of medieval matter (most obviously manuscripts and visual imagery, but also liturgical objects, coins, textiles, architecture, amulets, graves, etc.) to complement and even transcend purely textual sources is by now well established in medieval scholarship across the disciplines. So, too, attention to medieval sensory experiences—most prominently emotion—has transformed our understanding of medieval religious life and spirituality, violence, power, and authority, friendship, and constructions of both the self and the other. This session draws the two approaches together, plumbing medieval material sources for traces of sensory experience - above all ephemeral and physical experiences that, unlike emotion, are rarely fully described or articulated in texts.

Fiona Griffiths

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May 15th, 10:30 AM

Sensory Reflections: Traces of Experience in Medieval Artifacts II

Bernhard 211

The rich potential of medieval matter (most obviously manuscripts and visual imagery, but also liturgical objects, coins, textiles, architecture, amulets, graves, etc.) to complement and even transcend purely textual sources is by now well established in medieval scholarship across the disciplines. So, too, attention to medieval sensory experiences—most prominently emotion—has transformed our understanding of medieval religious life and spirituality, violence, power, and authority, friendship, and constructions of both the self and the other. This session draws the two approaches together, plumbing medieval material sources for traces of sensory experience - above all ephemeral and physical experiences that, unlike emotion, are rarely fully described or articulated in texts.

Fiona Griffiths