Session Title

Manuscripts and Marginalia: Traversing Textual Boundaries

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Studies Workshop, Univ. of Chicago

Organizer Name

Mark Lambert, Elizabeth Tavella

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago, Univ. of Chicago

Presider Name

Mark Lambert, Elizabeth Tavella

Paper Title 1

Dangerous Doodles? Icelandic Scribes and Their Marginalia

Presenter 1 Name

Christine Schott

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Erskine College

Paper Title 2

Editing from the London Thornton: Middle English Charlemagne Romances and Graphic Tail-Rhyme

Presenter 2 Name

Elizabeth Melick

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Kent State Univ.

Start Date

12-5-2016 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1280

Description

Our panel proposes further participation in the study of the periphery by grounding our investigations of the marginal in materiality, and in particular, manuscripts. How are borders traversed and transcended through, by and in medieval manuscripts? We are interested in the existence and purpose of both visual and textual marginalia. How do they encounter, entertain, and enlighten the reader, whether medieval or modern? How do they interact with or alter their parent text or image? We also host papers that play upon the theme of material marginality. What of manuscripts that are themselves marginalized as a consequence of censorship or obscurity? What can we know of the transmission, reception, and history of material texts/images on marginal topics, by marginal authors/artists, or to marginal audiences? We hope that a focus on the material record will enrich the ongoing discussion of marginality in medieval society and medieval studies.

Mark Lambert

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May 12th, 1:30 PM

Manuscripts and Marginalia: Traversing Textual Boundaries

Schneider 1280

Our panel proposes further participation in the study of the periphery by grounding our investigations of the marginal in materiality, and in particular, manuscripts. How are borders traversed and transcended through, by and in medieval manuscripts? We are interested in the existence and purpose of both visual and textual marginalia. How do they encounter, entertain, and enlighten the reader, whether medieval or modern? How do they interact with or alter their parent text or image? We also host papers that play upon the theme of material marginality. What of manuscripts that are themselves marginalized as a consequence of censorship or obscurity? What can we know of the transmission, reception, and history of material texts/images on marginal topics, by marginal authors/artists, or to marginal audiences? We hope that a focus on the material record will enrich the ongoing discussion of marginality in medieval society and medieval studies.

Mark Lambert