Session Title

Reading Chaucer Today: What's Love Got to Do with It?

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Thomas J. Farrell

Organizer Affiliation

Stetson Univ.

Presider Name

Thomas J. Farrell

Paper Title 1

No Love Lost: Chaucer’s Queer/Misogynist Narrator in Legend of Good Women

Presenter 1 Name

Elan Justice Pavlinich

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of South Florida

Paper Title 2

Inexpressible Agony and Ecstasy: Karol Wojtyla's Love and Responsibility in Books III and V of Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde

Presenter 2 Name

Arnaud H. Zimmern

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Paper Title 3

Falling in Love with a Poem: Troilus and Criseyde and Reading as Discernment

Presenter 3 Name

Megan Murton

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Catholic Univ. of America

Start Date

12-5-2016 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1355

Description

This session proposes readings of Chaucerian texts that address what has been characterized as the desire for an appreciation—an openness to love—that continues beyond (without occluding) the scholarly skepticism that we bring towards (especially) the antifeminism, the homoophobia, the social or intellectual structures encoded in medieval texts. Is that rapprochement, that tertia via possible? Can Chaucer, situated in "then" but speaking to "now," be read whole in a single moment? Or, while we consider "skeptical, detached critique" and "enthusiastic identification and engagement" both essential to humanistic study (borrowing the words of Harvard College), do we find the conflicts between those long and well developed modes of Humanistic thought inevitable, and if so, how do we respond?

Thomas J. Farrell

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May 12th, 1:30 PM

Reading Chaucer Today: What's Love Got to Do with It?

Schneider 1355

This session proposes readings of Chaucerian texts that address what has been characterized as the desire for an appreciation—an openness to love—that continues beyond (without occluding) the scholarly skepticism that we bring towards (especially) the antifeminism, the homoophobia, the social or intellectual structures encoded in medieval texts. Is that rapprochement, that tertia via possible? Can Chaucer, situated in "then" but speaking to "now," be read whole in a single moment? Or, while we consider "skeptical, detached critique" and "enthusiastic identification and engagement" both essential to humanistic study (borrowing the words of Harvard College), do we find the conflicts between those long and well developed modes of Humanistic thought inevitable, and if so, how do we respond?

Thomas J. Farrell