Session Title

Animal Languages

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Association of the Midwest (MAM)

Organizer Name

Alison Langdon

Organizer Affiliation

Western Kentucky Univ.

Presider Name

Alison Langdon

Paper Title 1

Bark Like a Man: Performance, Identity, and Boundary in Old English Animal Voice Catalogs

Presenter 1 Name

Robert Stanton

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Boston College

Paper Title 2

"Kek Kek": Translating Birds in Chaucer's Parliament of Fowls

Presenter 2 Name

Michael Warren (Karrer Travel Award Winner)

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Royal Holloway, Univ. of London

Paper Title 3

Ymagyned and Compyled: The Nightingale's Apparitional Voice

Presenter 3 Name

Carolynn Van Dyke

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Lafayette College

Paper Title 4

The Role of Interspecies Communication and Animal Theology in Saving the Medieval Christian

Presenter 4 Name

Anastasija Ropa (Edwards Memorial Travel Award Winner)

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Latvian Academy of Sport and Education

Start Date

12-5-2016 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 210

Description

Language is one trait by which medievals defined humans against other animals, yet at the same time many animals were understood to possess language of their own and in some cases to participate in human language. This session will explore questions such as: What kinds of communicative strategies did medievals recognize in the animal world, and how were they interpreted? How was human meaning imposed on animal vocalizations? How were animals themselves used as symbolic language in visual texts such as the Bayeux tapestry or manuscript illuminations?

Alison (Ganze) Langdon

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May 12th, 1:30 PM

Animal Languages

Bernhard 210

Language is one trait by which medievals defined humans against other animals, yet at the same time many animals were understood to possess language of their own and in some cases to participate in human language. This session will explore questions such as: What kinds of communicative strategies did medievals recognize in the animal world, and how were they interpreted? How was human meaning imposed on animal vocalizations? How were animals themselves used as symbolic language in visual texts such as the Bayeux tapestry or manuscript illuminations?

Alison (Ganze) Langdon