Session Title

Concepts of Camelot

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Arthurian Literature

Organizer Name

Elizabeth Archibald, David F. Johnson

Organizer Affiliation

Durham Univ., Florida State Univ.

Presider Name

Elizabeth Archibald

Paper Title 1

Empty Seats at the Round Table: Malory's Incomplete Idea of Camelot

Presenter 1 Name

Molly Martin

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Indianapolis

Paper Title 2

Bringing Camelot Down to Earth: The Feudal Ideal in Malory's Arthurian World

Presenter 2 Name

Stephen Atkinson

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Park Univ.

Paper Title 3

White's Camelot, Malory's Camelot

Presenter 3 Name

Louis J. Boyle

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Carlow Univ.

Paper Title 4

Cadbury and The Camelot Caper

Presenter 4 Name

Norris J. Lacy

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Pennsylvania State Univ.

Start Date

12-5-2016 3:30 PM

Session Location

Valley III Stinson Lounge

Description

'Camelot, located nowhere in particular, can be anywhere’, according to Norris Lacy. It is both a place and a concept. First mentioned by Chrétien de Troyes in the twelfth century, it moves around geographically but is almost more important as the primary evocation of the Arthurian ideal. This is perhaps even truer of post-medieval culture, as is evidenced by the use of the name in connection with President Kennedy. This session invites consideration of both city and concept(s). Louis Boyle will compare the way Camelot society is depicted by Malory and by White in the 'Poisoned Apple' episode. Molly Martin will consider the interrelationship of physical and social space in terms of the Round Table ideology and the communal identity of Camelot. Norris Lacy will discuss how Camelot may differ from other castles in relation to Elizabeth Peters' novel _The Camelot Caper_,in which Camelot is situated at Cadbury.

Elizabeth Archibald

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May 12th, 3:30 PM

Concepts of Camelot

Valley III Stinson Lounge

'Camelot, located nowhere in particular, can be anywhere’, according to Norris Lacy. It is both a place and a concept. First mentioned by Chrétien de Troyes in the twelfth century, it moves around geographically but is almost more important as the primary evocation of the Arthurian ideal. This is perhaps even truer of post-medieval culture, as is evidenced by the use of the name in connection with President Kennedy. This session invites consideration of both city and concept(s). Louis Boyle will compare the way Camelot society is depicted by Malory and by White in the 'Poisoned Apple' episode. Molly Martin will consider the interrelationship of physical and social space in terms of the Round Table ideology and the communal identity of Camelot. Norris Lacy will discuss how Camelot may differ from other castles in relation to Elizabeth Peters' novel _The Camelot Caper_,in which Camelot is situated at Cadbury.

Elizabeth Archibald