Session Title

Feminism with/out Gender (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

BABEL Working Group

Organizer Name

Robin Norris

Organizer Affiliation

Carleton Univ.

Presider Name

Damian Fleming

Presider Affiliation

Indiana Univ.-Purdue Univ.-Fort Wayne

Paper Title 1

"Ic ane geseah idese sittan": Old English Verse and the Bechdel-Wallace Test

Presenter 1 Name

Alexandra Reider

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Yale Univ.

Paper Title 2

"Þus oððe bet": Writing, Gender, and Anglo-Saxon Textual Practice

Presenter 2 Name

Thomas A. Bredehoft

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Chancery Hill Books and Antiques

Paper Title 3

Feminist Scholarship and Embodied Experience

Presenter 3 Name

Irina A. Dumitrescu

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Univ. Bonn

Paper Title 4

Why Do I Bake for Department Meetings?

Presenter 4 Name

Marian Bleeke

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Cleveland State Univ.

Paper Title 5

Working as (if) a Man: Relative Genders in the Academic Workplace

Presenter 5 Name

Suzanne Conklin Akbari

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 6

A Voice of One's Own: In Our Own Skin at Work

Presenter 6 Name

Alexa Huang

Presenter 6 Affiliation

George Washington Univ.

Start Date

11-5-2017 3:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1045

Description

What part does the performance of gender roles play in our professional, academic, and personal environments? How does the performance of femininity, in particular, intersect with the relations of power and privilege found in academic institutions and scholarly organizations? While masculinity as a social construct and a set of culturally enacted performances has received much critical attention, the performance of femininity – by those of any gender – has received less attention, especially in the context of academic life. To what extent do we (of any gender) find ourselves obliged to (or choosing to) perform femininity in the professional world? This might include performance of socially constructed norms such as listening rather than speaking, offering care or hospitality to the group, taking responsibility for community formation, or allowing others to take ownership of one’s spoken or written contributions. To what extent do we do the same in our personal or creative worlds? Writing practices, for example, are sometimes characterized in terms of gendered activity, such as the ‘woven text’ associated with women’s arts of the body. How does our commitment to feminism (in terms of a broader commitment to access) intersect with other kinds of commitments, perhaps especially including those that arise from trans issues, but also considering other intersectional commitments that engage with race, ethnicity, and religious identity? This roundtable will endeavor to take stock of how gender continues to inform daily life in our academic environments, within both institutional settings and scholarly organizations, and to consider how our communities might develop a more robust feminist ethics that facilitates access and makes space for other voices.

Robin Norris

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May 11th, 3:30 PM

Feminism with/out Gender (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 1045

What part does the performance of gender roles play in our professional, academic, and personal environments? How does the performance of femininity, in particular, intersect with the relations of power and privilege found in academic institutions and scholarly organizations? While masculinity as a social construct and a set of culturally enacted performances has received much critical attention, the performance of femininity – by those of any gender – has received less attention, especially in the context of academic life. To what extent do we (of any gender) find ourselves obliged to (or choosing to) perform femininity in the professional world? This might include performance of socially constructed norms such as listening rather than speaking, offering care or hospitality to the group, taking responsibility for community formation, or allowing others to take ownership of one’s spoken or written contributions. To what extent do we do the same in our personal or creative worlds? Writing practices, for example, are sometimes characterized in terms of gendered activity, such as the ‘woven text’ associated with women’s arts of the body. How does our commitment to feminism (in terms of a broader commitment to access) intersect with other kinds of commitments, perhaps especially including those that arise from trans issues, but also considering other intersectional commitments that engage with race, ethnicity, and religious identity? This roundtable will endeavor to take stock of how gender continues to inform daily life in our academic environments, within both institutional settings and scholarly organizations, and to consider how our communities might develop a more robust feminist ethics that facilitates access and makes space for other voices.

Robin Norris