Session Title

Fresh Perspectives on Medieval Pilgrimage: Canterbury Cathedral, Durham Cathedral, and York Minster

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Centre for the Study of Christianity and Culture, Univ. of York

Organizer Name

Dee Dyas

Organizer Affiliation

Centre for the Study of Christianity and Culture, Univ. of York

Presider Name

Anthony Bale

Presider Affiliation

Birkbeck, Univ. of London

Paper Title 1

"Surely this is no other than the gate of Heaven?": Analyzing and Replicating Medieval Pilgrim Experience

Presenter 1 Name

Dee Dyas

Paper Title 2

Sharing Sacred Space: Pilgrims, Priests and the Liturgy in English Cathedrals

Presenter 2 Name

John Jenkins

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of York

Paper Title 3

Presenting and Interpreting Medieval Saints Today: Pilgrims and Other Visitors to Canterbury, Durham, and York

Presenter 3 Name

Tiina Sepp

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of York

Start Date

11-5-2017 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1350

Description

This session will discuss some of the key findings of a three year interdisciplinary Arts and Humanities Research Council funded research project which explores the experience of pilgrims at three major medieval shrines, Canterbury, Durham, and York. The project draws on archival evidence, literary texts, pilgrim narratives, architectural developments, archaeological evidence and material culture, together with high level digital visualization of ways in which shrines were used, to identify the theological, sensory, cultural and social dynamics of pilgrimage experience. Historical evidence has been interrogated with a new focus on identifying the power of place and the role of sensory experience, including questions of why some shrines (such as Canterbury) achieved international significance and others (such as at York) failed to achieve wide popularity; and why some saints (such as Cuthbert at Durham) retained their appeal through the Reformation and secularisation. The session will also examine evidence of the ways in which shrines have been managed, highlighting issues of control and access. Dee Dyas

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May 11th, 3:30 PM

Fresh Perspectives on Medieval Pilgrimage: Canterbury Cathedral, Durham Cathedral, and York Minster

Schneider 1350

This session will discuss some of the key findings of a three year interdisciplinary Arts and Humanities Research Council funded research project which explores the experience of pilgrims at three major medieval shrines, Canterbury, Durham, and York. The project draws on archival evidence, literary texts, pilgrim narratives, architectural developments, archaeological evidence and material culture, together with high level digital visualization of ways in which shrines were used, to identify the theological, sensory, cultural and social dynamics of pilgrimage experience. Historical evidence has been interrogated with a new focus on identifying the power of place and the role of sensory experience, including questions of why some shrines (such as Canterbury) achieved international significance and others (such as at York) failed to achieve wide popularity; and why some saints (such as Cuthbert at Durham) retained their appeal through the Reformation and secularisation. The session will also examine evidence of the ways in which shrines have been managed, highlighting issues of control and access. Dee Dyas