Session Title

Early Medieval Monasticisms, New Questions, New Approaches II: Monasticisms before and after Benedict of Nursia

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Network for the Study of Late Antique and Early Medieval Monasticism

Organizer Name

Matthieu van der Meer, Albrecht Diem

Organizer Affiliation

Syracuse Univ., Syracuse Univ.

Presider Name

Matthieu van der Meer

Paper Title 1

Pre-Benedictine Monasticism in Sixth-Century Rome

Presenter 1 Name

Andrea Antonio Verardi

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. degli Studi di Roma "La Sapienza"/Pontificia Univ. Gregoriana

Paper Title 2

Beyond the Cloister: Wandering Monks and Nuns in Early Ireland

Presenter 2 Name

Westley Follett

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Southern Mississippi-Gulf Coast

Paper Title 3

Irish Monasticism prior to the Arrival of the New Orders

Presenter 3 Name

Elaine Pereira Farrell

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. College Dublin

Paper Title 4

A Cell of One's Own: Recluses, Hermits, and Anchorites in the Carolingian World

Presenter 4 Name

Ingrid Rembold

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Hertford College, Univ. of Oxford

Start Date

11-5-2017 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 211

Description

This session compares different monastic worlds in the early medieval West on the basis of a number of case studies on Italian, Irish and Carolingian monasticism. The papers show that we should rather speak of monasticisms than of monasticism. Comparing the worlds of urban and rural communities in Italy and Ireland, of Irish wandering monks, and Carolingian hermits) shows how little common monastic typologies (e.g. Benedict’s genera monachorum) do justice to the varieties of monastic forms of life.

Matthieu Herman van der Meer

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May 11th, 3:30 PM

Early Medieval Monasticisms, New Questions, New Approaches II: Monasticisms before and after Benedict of Nursia

Bernhard 211

This session compares different monastic worlds in the early medieval West on the basis of a number of case studies on Italian, Irish and Carolingian monasticism. The papers show that we should rather speak of monasticisms than of monasticism. Comparing the worlds of urban and rural communities in Italy and Ireland, of Irish wandering monks, and Carolingian hermits) shows how little common monastic typologies (e.g. Benedict’s genera monachorum) do justice to the varieties of monastic forms of life.

Matthieu Herman van der Meer