Session Title

Collective (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Material Collective

Organizer Name

Joy Partridge, Alexa Sand

Organizer Affiliation

Graduate Center, CUNY, Utah State Univ.

Presider Name

Alexa Sand

Paper Title 1

We Are the Union

Presenter 1 Name

Maggie M. Williams

Presenter 1 Affiliation

William Paterson Univ./Material Collective

Paper Title 2

Bad "We's"

Presenter 2 Name

Julie Orlemanski

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Paper Title 3

With and against Objects, and Ourselves

Presenter 3 Name

Benjamin C. Tilghman

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Lawrence Univ./Material Collective

Paper Title 4

From Collaboration to Community: Art History That

Presenter 4 Name

Amy K. Hamlin, Karen J. Leader

Presenter 4 Affiliation

St. Catherine Univ., Florida Atlantic Univ.

Paper Title 5

Do We Only Preserve What We Enjoy? Sustaining Images of Medieval Art and Architecture

Presenter 5 Name

Alison Langmead, Aisling Quigley

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of Pittsburgh, Univ. of Pittsburgh

Start Date

11-5-2017 3:30 PM

Session Location

Sangren 1730

Description

As either a noun or an adjective, the term ‘collective’ refers to the assemblage of disparate entities into a whole. Even when that whole is singular, it is rarely entirely uniform. Medieval owners could gather diverse objects into hoards, burials, church treasuries, and libraries. Modern assemblages—in museums, libraries, and through digital platforms—may disperse or draw together medieval objects. People can be collective, too, and individual minds and personalities might join together in a common enterprise—medieval or modern.

Using medieval models like the universitas and the artists’ guilds, this session interrogates the term collective in every sense. How can an investigation of the word help us to understand more about how we view medieval culture and also how we function as scholars and workers in 21st century Medieval Studies? What are the inherent advantages and difficulties of collectivity, collections, or collective action?

Joy Partridge

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May 11th, 3:30 PM

Collective (A Roundtable)

Sangren 1730

As either a noun or an adjective, the term ‘collective’ refers to the assemblage of disparate entities into a whole. Even when that whole is singular, it is rarely entirely uniform. Medieval owners could gather diverse objects into hoards, burials, church treasuries, and libraries. Modern assemblages—in museums, libraries, and through digital platforms—may disperse or draw together medieval objects. People can be collective, too, and individual minds and personalities might join together in a common enterprise—medieval or modern.

Using medieval models like the universitas and the artists’ guilds, this session interrogates the term collective in every sense. How can an investigation of the word help us to understand more about how we view medieval culture and also how we function as scholars and workers in 21st century Medieval Studies? What are the inherent advantages and difficulties of collectivity, collections, or collective action?

Joy Partridge