Session Title

The Virgin as Bridge: Cultural Exchange and Connection through Images of the Virgin Mary

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Diliana Angelova, Amanda Luyster

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of California-Berkeley, College of the Holy Cross

Presider Name

Amanda Luyster

Paper Title 1

The Virgin: Bridging Flesh, Matter, and Spirit

Presenter 1 Name

Diliana Angelova

Paper Title 2

The Earliest Icons of the Virgin in Rome: East or West?

Presenter 2 Name

Maria Lidova (Congress Travel Award Winner)

Presenter 2 Affiliation

British Museum

Paper Title 3

Saint Bridget's Vision of the Nativity: Cultural Exchange through Mental Images of the Virgin Mary

Presenter 3 Name

Fabian Wolf (Karrer Travel Award Winner)

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Städel Museum

Paper Title 4

"En la forma y suerte que esta en su sanctuario": Hybridity, Materiality, and Nuestra Señora de Guadeloupe in Extremadura

Presenter 4 Name

Nicole Corrigan

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Emory Univ.

Start Date

11-5-2017 7:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 2040

Description

Across the medieval Mediterranean and beyond, people of many faiths and backgrounds sought the succor of the miraculous virgin and mother, Mary. Christians venerated Mary as the holiest figure of Christianity after Christ, the one thanks to whom the divine mystery of the Incarnation was fulfilled. The Koran also hailed her as chosen by Allah. Converts to Christianity from paganism or Islam were often said to be motivated by their great love of the Virgin. Byzantine churches were incomplete without her image in the holiest of holies, the apse of the sanctuary. In the West, the grandest Gothic cathedrals rose in her honor. Objects such as the thirteenth-century Freer canteen, as well as shared shrines, suggest that Marian images could be appreciated by audiences professing different faiths. Images of the Virgin acted as a shared touchpoint between people of many different backgrounds, socio-economic strata, and faiths.

This panel includes papers that focus on the capacity of the Virgin to act as a bridge or cultural mediator: between regions, between genders, between political factions and cities, and between belief systems. Panel participants may focus on representations of the Virgin as well as references to religious practices associated with images of the Virgin. Icons, cult centers, manuscripts, monumental sculpture, wall-painting, architecture, as well as practices associated with all of these, may be considered.

Amanda R. Luyster

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May 11th, 7:30 PM

The Virgin as Bridge: Cultural Exchange and Connection through Images of the Virgin Mary

Fetzer 2040

Across the medieval Mediterranean and beyond, people of many faiths and backgrounds sought the succor of the miraculous virgin and mother, Mary. Christians venerated Mary as the holiest figure of Christianity after Christ, the one thanks to whom the divine mystery of the Incarnation was fulfilled. The Koran also hailed her as chosen by Allah. Converts to Christianity from paganism or Islam were often said to be motivated by their great love of the Virgin. Byzantine churches were incomplete without her image in the holiest of holies, the apse of the sanctuary. In the West, the grandest Gothic cathedrals rose in her honor. Objects such as the thirteenth-century Freer canteen, as well as shared shrines, suggest that Marian images could be appreciated by audiences professing different faiths. Images of the Virgin acted as a shared touchpoint between people of many different backgrounds, socio-economic strata, and faiths.

This panel includes papers that focus on the capacity of the Virgin to act as a bridge or cultural mediator: between regions, between genders, between political factions and cities, and between belief systems. Panel participants may focus on representations of the Virgin as well as references to religious practices associated with images of the Virgin. Icons, cult centers, manuscripts, monumental sculpture, wall-painting, architecture, as well as practices associated with all of these, may be considered.

Amanda R. Luyster