Session Title

Fanfiction in Medieval Studies: What Do We Mean When We Say "Fanfiction"?

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Anna Wilson

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Presider Name

Anna Wilson

Paper Title 1

Fanfic: The Impossible Gift?

Presenter 1 Name

Kristin Noone

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Irvine Valley College

Paper Title 2

Republics of Games: Literary Culture and Game Structures before and after Print

Presenter 2 Name

Elyse Graham

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Stony Brook Univ.

Paper Title 3

A Gawain of Our Own: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Canonicity, and Audience Participation

Presenter 3 Name

Angela Florschuetz

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Cheyney Univ.

Paper Title 4

Writing Her Own Deliverance: Christine de Pizan's The Book of the City of Ladies as Reclamatory Fan Work

Presenter 4 Name

Elizabeth J. Nielsen

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Massachusetts-Amherst

Start Date

11-5-2017 7:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 208

Description

The papers in “What Do We Mean When We Say Fanfiction?” will discuss medieval texts and practices with reflection on the following questions: what characterises fanfiction or fandom before the rise of the technologies - the printing press, the photocopier, the internet - without which it is impossible to imagine modern fandom? is it the intensity of readerly affect? the mere fact of rewriting or reinterpretation of a pre-existing text? resemblance to modern fanfiction tropes? the existence of a ‘virtual community’ of readers? How might using the term ‘fanfiction’ occlude or erase important details of the way medieval readers experienced texts? How might it bring to the fore elements previously neglected?

Anna P. Wilson

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May 11th, 7:30 PM

Fanfiction in Medieval Studies: What Do We Mean When We Say "Fanfiction"?

Bernhard 208

The papers in “What Do We Mean When We Say Fanfiction?” will discuss medieval texts and practices with reflection on the following questions: what characterises fanfiction or fandom before the rise of the technologies - the printing press, the photocopier, the internet - without which it is impossible to imagine modern fandom? is it the intensity of readerly affect? the mere fact of rewriting or reinterpretation of a pre-existing text? resemblance to modern fanfiction tropes? the existence of a ‘virtual community’ of readers? How might using the term ‘fanfiction’ occlude or erase important details of the way medieval readers experienced texts? How might it bring to the fore elements previously neglected?

Anna P. Wilson