Session Title

The Teaching of Old English (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Old English Forum, Modern Language Association

Organizer Name

Matthew T. Hussey

Organizer Affiliation

Simon Fraser Univ.

Presider Name

Robin Norris

Presider Affiliation

Carleton Univ.

Paper Title 1

A Course in Beowulf and Tolkien

Presenter 1 Name

Paul Acker

Presenter 1 Affiliation

St. Louis Univ.

Paper Title 2

Teaching Old English in History of the English Language

Presenter 2 Name

Heide Estes

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Monmouth Univ.

Paper Title 3

Assignments to Enliven a Dead Language

Presenter 3 Name

Jacqueline A. Fay

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Texas-Arlington

Paper Title 4

An Anglo-Saxon Sampler

Presenter 4 Name

Damian Fleming

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Indiana Univ.-Purdue Univ.-Fort Wayne

Paper Title 5

Material Culture and Old English Pedagogy

Presenter 5 Name

M. Breann Leake

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of Connecticut

Paper Title 6

Reading Like Anglo-Saxons

Presenter 6 Name

Erica Weaver

Presenter 6 Affiliation

Harvard Univ.

Start Date

11-5-2017 7:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 210

Description

The Teaching of Old English

At the 2016 International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, the MLA Old English Forum sponsored a session on the “Business of Old English.” One aspect of that business was the state of teaching Old English at universities and colleges across the United States, which gave a big picture survey of the current numbers of institutions and people teaching Old English. Building on that discussion, for the 2017 Kalamazoo Congress, the MLA Old English forum is sponsoring a roundtable that takes up the teaching of Old English with a much more detailed and hands-on approach.

Across various sizes and types of institutions, with students having diverse skills and training, in both formal and informal course rubrics, Old English is being taught, and taught well. In this roundtable, panelists will take up concrete issues in teaching Old English, such as texts and their formats, structure of syllabuses, in-class exercises, term projects, recruitment, and more. The presentations focus on the immediate work of teaching the language to our students. After the short presentations by the panel, we seek an open discussion of what does and does not work in class and how to make our teaching of Old English better, stronger, and more meaningful.

Matthew T. Hussey

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May 11th, 7:30 PM

The Teaching of Old English (A Roundtable)

Bernhard 210

The Teaching of Old English

At the 2016 International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, the MLA Old English Forum sponsored a session on the “Business of Old English.” One aspect of that business was the state of teaching Old English at universities and colleges across the United States, which gave a big picture survey of the current numbers of institutions and people teaching Old English. Building on that discussion, for the 2017 Kalamazoo Congress, the MLA Old English forum is sponsoring a roundtable that takes up the teaching of Old English with a much more detailed and hands-on approach.

Across various sizes and types of institutions, with students having diverse skills and training, in both formal and informal course rubrics, Old English is being taught, and taught well. In this roundtable, panelists will take up concrete issues in teaching Old English, such as texts and their formats, structure of syllabuses, in-class exercises, term projects, recruitment, and more. The presentations focus on the immediate work of teaching the language to our students. After the short presentations by the panel, we seek an open discussion of what does and does not work in class and how to make our teaching of Old English better, stronger, and more meaningful.

Matthew T. Hussey