Session Title

Movement and Meaning in Early Medieval Literature

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Rebecca E. Straple

Organizer Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Presider Name

Rebecca E. Straple

Paper Title 1

The Movement of Christian Experience in The Dream of the Rood

Presenter 1 Name

Mary Leech

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Cincinnati

Paper Title 2

Travel, Escape, and Amplificatio in Reginald's Malchus

Presenter 2 Name

Monika Otter

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Dartmouth College

Paper Title 3

Movement, Space, and Gender in the Mercian Register of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle

Presenter 3 Name

Kelly Williams

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign

Start Date

12-5-2017 10:00 AM

Session Location

Valley I Hadley 102

Description

This session is on movement and meaning--that is, the representation of physical movement as well as the use of movement as metaphor--in early medieval texts. Is physical movement actually present, but harder to find or define, in early medieval texts than in later? Does movement function more metaphorically in these texts? Must "movement" be defined differently for the literature of the early medieval period? This session will provide an opportunity for early medievalists to answer some of these questions, to discuss how movement functions in early medieval texts, and to examine concerns surrounding how early medievalists research, define, analyze, and make meaning out of movement in the texts they study.

-Rebecca E. Straple

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May 12th, 10:00 AM

Movement and Meaning in Early Medieval Literature

Valley I Hadley 102

This session is on movement and meaning--that is, the representation of physical movement as well as the use of movement as metaphor--in early medieval texts. Is physical movement actually present, but harder to find or define, in early medieval texts than in later? Does movement function more metaphorically in these texts? Must "movement" be defined differently for the literature of the early medieval period? This session will provide an opportunity for early medievalists to answer some of these questions, to discuss how movement functions in early medieval texts, and to examine concerns surrounding how early medievalists research, define, analyze, and make meaning out of movement in the texts they study.

-Rebecca E. Straple