Session Title

The Stones Cry Out: Modes of Citation in Medieval Architecture

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Lindsay S. Cook, Zachary Stewart

Organizer Affiliation

Columbia Univ., Fordham Univ.

Presider Name

Lindsay S. Cook, Zachary Stewart

Paper Title 1

A "Bible in Stone"? The Sculptures of the West Facade of Amiens and Contemporary Modes of Citation

Presenter 1 Name

Jennifer M. Feltman

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Alabama

Paper Title 2

Nicolaus Cusanus's Sankt Nikolaus Hospital (1458) in Bernkastel-Kues, Germany: Appropriations of/Deviations from the Mediterranean Contemporary Canons

Presenter 2 Name

Il Kim

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Auburn Univ.

Start Date

12-5-2017 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 158

Description

Over the past several decades, a growing number of scholars have examined, in explicit terms, the role of citation in architectural production during the Middle Ages. On the one hand, their work has been of great benefit to the field, demonstrating that citation is a productive paradigm for understanding the ways in which isomorphic relationships enable spatial environments to create, support, or subvert social orders. On the other hand, their work has also raised troubling questions about the capacity of buildings to convey meaning, assuming as it does that architecture, like language, functions as a coherent semiotic system. Vitruvius laid the groundwork for the application of this logocentric analogy to classical architecture, but does it necessarily obtain within all modes of architectural production, particularly those considered un- or anti-classical? What are the advantages or disadvantages of choosing citation—versus imitation, replication, appropriation, influence, or habit—as a discursive frame for studying the recurrence of formal elements within architectural ensembles? How does such a visually oriented method address issues of production, perception, technology, function, and value? How might it alter current accounts of the design, construction, and meaning of buildings modeled after famous precedents?

Lindsay Cook

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May 12th, 10:00 AM

The Stones Cry Out: Modes of Citation in Medieval Architecture

Bernhard 158

Over the past several decades, a growing number of scholars have examined, in explicit terms, the role of citation in architectural production during the Middle Ages. On the one hand, their work has been of great benefit to the field, demonstrating that citation is a productive paradigm for understanding the ways in which isomorphic relationships enable spatial environments to create, support, or subvert social orders. On the other hand, their work has also raised troubling questions about the capacity of buildings to convey meaning, assuming as it does that architecture, like language, functions as a coherent semiotic system. Vitruvius laid the groundwork for the application of this logocentric analogy to classical architecture, but does it necessarily obtain within all modes of architectural production, particularly those considered un- or anti-classical? What are the advantages or disadvantages of choosing citation—versus imitation, replication, appropriation, influence, or habit—as a discursive frame for studying the recurrence of formal elements within architectural ensembles? How does such a visually oriented method address issues of production, perception, technology, function, and value? How might it alter current accounts of the design, construction, and meaning of buildings modeled after famous precedents?

Lindsay Cook