Session Title

New Research in Parish Church Art and Architecture in England and on the Continent, 1100-1600 I

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Sarah Blick

Organizer Affiliation

Kenyon College

Presider Name

Louise Hampson

Presider Affiliation

Centre for the Study of Christianity and Culture, Univ. of York

Paper Title 1

The Font Canopy at Saint Peter Mancroft, Norwich: Toward a Reconstruction with New Finds from the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Presenter 1 Name

Amy Gillette, Zachary Stewart

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Temple Univ., Fordham Univ.

Paper Title 2

"High and Lifted Up": The Elevation of the Host and the Reservation of the Sacrament in Late Medieval England

Presenter 2 Name

Allan Barton

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Wales Trinity St. David

Paper Title 3

Mercantile Ambitions and Angelic Representations in Late Medieval Norwich

Presenter 3 Name

Sarah Cassell

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of East Anglia

Paper Title 4

The Early Sixteenth-Century Stained-Glass Program of Saint Michael-le-Belfrey, York: Intersections between Lay Piety and Imaging the Community of Saints

Presenter 4 Name

Lisa Reilly, Mary B. Shepard

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Virginia, Univ. of Arkansas-Fort Smith

Start Date

12-5-2017 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 2040

Description

Medieval parish churches though created as placed to celebrate the liturgy, became true community centers. Parishioners would agree on business deals at the church door, hold village celebrations in the churchyard, and paid taxes, organized poor relief, lent out plows, placed fire-fighting equipment and agreed-upon weights and measures, and stored important documents in the nave and tower. Because villagers had reasons to enter the church almost every day, artist and patrons sought to create compelling visual images that would continue to engage the parishioners over many years.

These sessions seek papers that explore new approaches to some very old architecture, sculpture, painting, and other church furnishings. Why were certain plans acceptable and others ignored? What determined the placement of windows, doors, ceiling openings, and trapdoors and how did that change throughout the centuries? How did artists respond to increased demand from pious laypeople for intense, emotional devotion, but in a public space through ever-changing decorative programs?

Sarah Blick

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May 12th, 1:30 PM

New Research in Parish Church Art and Architecture in England and on the Continent, 1100-1600 I

Fetzer 2040

Medieval parish churches though created as placed to celebrate the liturgy, became true community centers. Parishioners would agree on business deals at the church door, hold village celebrations in the churchyard, and paid taxes, organized poor relief, lent out plows, placed fire-fighting equipment and agreed-upon weights and measures, and stored important documents in the nave and tower. Because villagers had reasons to enter the church almost every day, artist and patrons sought to create compelling visual images that would continue to engage the parishioners over many years.

These sessions seek papers that explore new approaches to some very old architecture, sculpture, painting, and other church furnishings. Why were certain plans acceptable and others ignored? What determined the placement of windows, doors, ceiling openings, and trapdoors and how did that change throughout the centuries? How did artists respond to increased demand from pious laypeople for intense, emotional devotion, but in a public space through ever-changing decorative programs?

Sarah Blick