Session Title

Early Middle English, the Idea of the Vernacular, and Multilingual Manuscripts (1100-1350)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Early Middle English Society

Organizer Name

Dorothy Kim

Organizer Affiliation

Vassar College

Presider Name

Carla María Thomas

Presider Affiliation

New York Univ.

Paper Title 1

Old Woods, New Forests: Deorfrið in Old and Middle English

Presenter 1 Name

Marian Homans-Turnbull

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Berkeley

Paper Title 2

"On englissch this is youre Pater noster": English Latin in the Auchinleck Manuscript

Presenter 2 Name

Marjorie Harrington

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Paper Title 3

Music, Multilingual Manuscripts, and the Medieval Lyric

Presenter 3 Name

Dorothy Kim

Start Date

12-5-2017 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1325

Description

Theories of the vernacular has often focused on late medieval manuscripts. This session will ask what happens with the heavily multilingual manuscripts of the Early Middle English period (c. 1100-1350). How does multilingual Anglo-Norman French, Middle English, and often Latin texts help us retheorize the idea of the vernacular for this period? We are interested in a wide range of approaches to multilingual manuscripts, including a number of languages--Latin, Hebrew, Anglo-Norman French, Celtic (Irish and Welsh), Middle English, Old English, etc.--and also the manuscript present of music, law, and iconography. According to its mission statement, the Early Middle English Society “seeks to promote the study and scholarly discussion of English literary and cultural production from the Norman Conquest to the mid-fourteenth century, especially in relation to the two areas that book-end ours: the Anglo-Saxon period and the Middle English period after the plague.” As a result, we invite proposals that explore how Early Middle English manuscripts relate to Anglo-Saxon and later Middle English manuscript culture in constructing ideas of the vernacular. In this session, we also strongly encourage papers that discuss non-English vernacular languages and their manuscripts, including Anglo-Norman and Celtic languages, among others.

Dorothy Kim

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May 12th, 1:30 PM

Early Middle English, the Idea of the Vernacular, and Multilingual Manuscripts (1100-1350)

Schneider 1325

Theories of the vernacular has often focused on late medieval manuscripts. This session will ask what happens with the heavily multilingual manuscripts of the Early Middle English period (c. 1100-1350). How does multilingual Anglo-Norman French, Middle English, and often Latin texts help us retheorize the idea of the vernacular for this period? We are interested in a wide range of approaches to multilingual manuscripts, including a number of languages--Latin, Hebrew, Anglo-Norman French, Celtic (Irish and Welsh), Middle English, Old English, etc.--and also the manuscript present of music, law, and iconography. According to its mission statement, the Early Middle English Society “seeks to promote the study and scholarly discussion of English literary and cultural production from the Norman Conquest to the mid-fourteenth century, especially in relation to the two areas that book-end ours: the Anglo-Saxon period and the Middle English period after the plague.” As a result, we invite proposals that explore how Early Middle English manuscripts relate to Anglo-Saxon and later Middle English manuscript culture in constructing ideas of the vernacular. In this session, we also strongly encourage papers that discuss non-English vernacular languages and their manuscripts, including Anglo-Norman and Celtic languages, among others.

Dorothy Kim