Session Title

The Cultures of Georgia and Armenia

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Rare Book Dept., The Free Library of Philadelphia

Organizer Name

Bert Beynen

Organizer Affiliation

Temple Univ.

Presider Name

Bert Beynen

Paper Title 1

The Year 1000 in the Armenian Imagination

Presenter 1 Name

Sergio La Porta

Presenter 1 Affiliation

California State Univ.-Fresno

Paper Title 4

The Apostle Andrew in Georgia: A Comparative Study of Literary Sources and Archaeological Discoveries

Start Date

12-5-2017 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 106

Description

Professor La Porta compares Armenian eschatological expectations with Western and Byzantine predictions on the basis of historical, epigraphic and colophonic data. Ms. Petrosyan examines The Book of the Translator, a religious and philosophical lexicon written around 1000 A.D. by Eliya of Nisibis (975-1046) about Syriac terms with Arabic and Armenian explanations, which seems to indicate peaceful interactions between the three populations. Professor Chachanidze gives an overview of the current efforts to locate Georgian manuscripts in Samarkand, some of which may go back to around 1400, when they were taken there by Timur or Tamerlan. Professor Guchua discusses forms of address for e.g. dukes, the queen, Grigoli, monks, noblemen, kuropalates, hereby providing information about the social stratification of Georgian society of those times. Professor Licheli examines data on the Apostle Andrew in Kartlis Tskhovreba (The Life Of Georgia), an Old Georgian chronicle, in the view of recent archaeological discoveries

Bert Beynen

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 12th, 1:30 PM

The Cultures of Georgia and Armenia

Bernhard 106

Professor La Porta compares Armenian eschatological expectations with Western and Byzantine predictions on the basis of historical, epigraphic and colophonic data. Ms. Petrosyan examines The Book of the Translator, a religious and philosophical lexicon written around 1000 A.D. by Eliya of Nisibis (975-1046) about Syriac terms with Arabic and Armenian explanations, which seems to indicate peaceful interactions between the three populations. Professor Chachanidze gives an overview of the current efforts to locate Georgian manuscripts in Samarkand, some of which may go back to around 1400, when they were taken there by Timur or Tamerlan. Professor Guchua discusses forms of address for e.g. dukes, the queen, Grigoli, monks, noblemen, kuropalates, hereby providing information about the social stratification of Georgian society of those times. Professor Licheli examines data on the Apostle Andrew in Kartlis Tskhovreba (The Life Of Georgia), an Old Georgian chronicle, in the view of recent archaeological discoveries

Bert Beynen