Session Title

Cross-Cultural Images and Crafts: Transcultural Objects and Artisanal Migration

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Academy of America

Organizer Name

Leor Halevi, Sara Lipton

Organizer Affiliation

Vanderbilt Univ., Stony Brook Univ.

Presider Name

Leor Halevi

Paper Title 1

Mediterranean Stylistic Influences in the Book of Durrow and the Book of Kells: Mimesis and Metamorphosis in Irish Manuscript Illumination, 700-1000 CE

Presenter 1 Name

Laura McCloskey

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Trinity College Dublin, Univ. of Dublin

Paper Title 2

Christian/Jewish Interaction in Parisian Luxury Workshops of the Thirteenth Century

Presenter 2 Name

Sharon Farmer

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Santa Barbara

Paper Title 3

Cross-Cultural Animal Fables: Comparative Iconography in Three Kalila wa Dimna Manuscripts

Presenter 3 Name

Anna D. Russakoff

Presenter 3 Affiliation

American Univ. of Paris

Start Date

12-5-2017 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard Brown & Gold Room

Description

Globalization is stimulating medievalists to examine the mobility of things and persons across cultures in the distant past. While contributing to this emerging field, the purpose of our linked pair of panels is to concentrate, from very different perspectives, on religious boundaries and cross-cultural exchange in the first half of the second millennium. Special attention will be paid to the consequences of cross-cultural trade. What were the economic, social, cultural, legal, or artistic effects of the movement of merchants, artisans, and others? This panel will deal with material objects and their makers; it is linked to a second panel that will deal with legal and doctrinal matters relating to interfaith commerce.

Sara Lipton

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May 12th, 1:30 PM

Cross-Cultural Images and Crafts: Transcultural Objects and Artisanal Migration

Bernhard Brown & Gold Room

Globalization is stimulating medievalists to examine the mobility of things and persons across cultures in the distant past. While contributing to this emerging field, the purpose of our linked pair of panels is to concentrate, from very different perspectives, on religious boundaries and cross-cultural exchange in the first half of the second millennium. Special attention will be paid to the consequences of cross-cultural trade. What were the economic, social, cultural, legal, or artistic effects of the movement of merchants, artisans, and others? This panel will deal with material objects and their makers; it is linked to a second panel that will deal with legal and doctrinal matters relating to interfaith commerce.

Sara Lipton