Session Title

Deep Mapping and the Middle Ages

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Joey McMullen, Helen Davies

Organizer Affiliation

Centenary Univ., Univ. of Rochester

Presider Name

Brian Cook

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Mississippi

Paper Title 1

Medieval Overlay Landscapes, Deep Mapping, and the Spatial Humanities

Presenter 1 Name

Joey McMullen

Paper Title 2

Mappa Mundi: Deep Maps of the Middle Ages

Presenter 2 Name

Helen Davies

Start Date

11-5-2017 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1360

Description

This panel will ask how new advances in deep mapping can assist our understanding of the Middle Ages. As deep mapping is still a new field in the spatial humanities, we will also how medieval literature and its landscapes might shape future developments in deep mapping. In many medieval works, the creation of place and place-name exposes a cultural process whereby topography and tradition overlap, producing a landscape layered with meaning that in turn establishes and maintains social identity. This panel will use digital tools to help visually represent the natural world. In the process, we may also realize that deep maps are the only way to approximate fully this nuanced overlay found in early conceptions of the natural world.

Albert J. McMullen

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 11th, 10:00 AM

Deep Mapping and the Middle Ages

Schneider 1360

This panel will ask how new advances in deep mapping can assist our understanding of the Middle Ages. As deep mapping is still a new field in the spatial humanities, we will also how medieval literature and its landscapes might shape future developments in deep mapping. In many medieval works, the creation of place and place-name exposes a cultural process whereby topography and tradition overlap, producing a landscape layered with meaning that in turn establishes and maintains social identity. This panel will use digital tools to help visually represent the natural world. In the process, we may also realize that deep maps are the only way to approximate fully this nuanced overlay found in early conceptions of the natural world.

Albert J. McMullen