Session Title

Secular Clergy and the Laity III: Episcopal Roles

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Episcopus: Society for the Study of Bishops and Secular Clergy in the Middle Ages

Organizer Name

Michael Burger

Organizer Affiliation

Auburn Univ.-Montgomery

Presider Name

Kalani Craig

Presider Affiliation

Indiana Univ.-Bloomington

Paper Title 1

Friendship, Queenship, and Investiture: The Function of Friendship between Saint Anselm, Queen Matilda, and Countess Matilda of Tuscany

Presenter 1 Name

Hollie Devaney

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Hull

Paper Title 2

Conjuratio Concordiam? Intentionality and Sorcery in the Conflict between the Bishop of Mende and the Lord Apcher

Presenter 2 Name

Jan K. Bulman

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Auburn Univ.-Montgomery

Paper Title 3

"In my lands I will be pope, archbishop, bishop, archdeacon, and dean": Secular Princes and Prince-Bishops in Pre-Reformation Germany

Presenter 3 Name

Brian A. Pavlac

Presenter 3 Affiliation

King's College, Pennsylvania

Start Date

12-5-2017 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1275

Description

Clergy and laity needed each other. Clergy needed lay support—consider, for example, lay founders and donors to churches, and laity at the least, for example, needed the sacraments (except when they disputed that clerical monopoly) or skills such as literacy enjoyed by clergy. Yet these groups were often in conflict: consider, just as a start, conflict over tithes, heresy, control of ecclesiastical appointments, and, in some cases, exercise of lay lordship by ecclesiastics and ecclesiastical corporations (consider, for example, relations between clerical landholders and lay tenants). This large issue of clerical/lay was common to a range of times and place, thus interests researchers over the whole of the Middle Ages, and in both Eastern and Western Christianity.

Michael Burger

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May 12th, 3:30 PM

Secular Clergy and the Laity III: Episcopal Roles

Schneider 1275

Clergy and laity needed each other. Clergy needed lay support—consider, for example, lay founders and donors to churches, and laity at the least, for example, needed the sacraments (except when they disputed that clerical monopoly) or skills such as literacy enjoyed by clergy. Yet these groups were often in conflict: consider, just as a start, conflict over tithes, heresy, control of ecclesiastical appointments, and, in some cases, exercise of lay lordship by ecclesiastics and ecclesiastical corporations (consider, for example, relations between clerical landholders and lay tenants). This large issue of clerical/lay was common to a range of times and place, thus interests researchers over the whole of the Middle Ages, and in both Eastern and Western Christianity.

Michael Burger