Session Title

Trading with Infidels: Legal Approaches to Interfaith Commerce

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Academy of America

Organizer Name

Leor Halevi, Sara Lipton

Organizer Affiliation

Vanderbilt Univ., Stony Brook Univ.

Presider Name

Leor Halevi

Paper Title 1

Trading on Identity: Geniza Merchants and the Law

Presenter 1 Name

Jessica Goldberg

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Los Angeles

Paper Title 2

Beyond Trade and Crusade: Venetian and Genoese Perspectives toward Trade with the Infidel

Presenter 2 Name

Stefan Stantchev

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Arizona State Univ.

Paper Title 3

The Iberian Paradox: Trade with Muslims and Legal Fluctuations from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic (Fourteenth-Fifteenth Century)

Presenter 3 Name

Giuseppe Marcocci

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. degli Studi di Tuscia

Start Date

12-5-2017 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard Brown & Gold Room

Description

Globalization is stimulating medievalists to examine the mobility of things and persons across cultures in the distant past. While contributing to this emerging field, the purpose of our linked pair of panels is to concentrate, from very different perspectives, on religious boundaries and cross-cultural exchange in the first half of the second millennium. Special attention will be paid to the consequences of cross-cultural trade. What were the economic, social, cultural, legal, or artistic effects of the movement of merchants, artisans, and others? This panel will deal with legal and doctrinal matters relating to interfaith commerce. A linked session will deal with material objects and their makers.

Sara Lipton

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May 12th, 3:30 PM

Trading with Infidels: Legal Approaches to Interfaith Commerce

Bernhard Brown & Gold Room

Globalization is stimulating medievalists to examine the mobility of things and persons across cultures in the distant past. While contributing to this emerging field, the purpose of our linked pair of panels is to concentrate, from very different perspectives, on religious boundaries and cross-cultural exchange in the first half of the second millennium. Special attention will be paid to the consequences of cross-cultural trade. What were the economic, social, cultural, legal, or artistic effects of the movement of merchants, artisans, and others? This panel will deal with legal and doctrinal matters relating to interfaith commerce. A linked session will deal with material objects and their makers.

Sara Lipton