Session Title

Access and the Academy (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

BABEL Working Group

Organizer Name

Robin Norris

Organizer Affiliation

Carleton Univ.

Presider Name

Richard H. Godden

Presider Affiliation

Loyola Univ. New Orleans

Paper Title 1

The "Diagnosis" of Pregnancy and Academic Anxiety

Presenter 1 Name

Mary Rambaran-Olm

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Glasgow

Paper Title 2

Re-visualizing Medieval Studies

Presenter 2 Name

Anessa Kemna

Presenter 2 Affiliation

St. Louis Univ.

Paper Title 3

Teaching and Access

Presenter 3 Name

Joshua Eyler

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Rice Univ.

Paper Title 4

How to Use Content Warnings

Presenter 4 Name

Kaitlin Heller

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Syracuse Univ.

Start Date

12-5-2017 3:30 PM

Session Location

Sangren 1920

Description

What does access mean in the social, professional, and institutional landscapes of academia today? How can medieval studies become more accessible to everyone who participates in it: scholars, students, artists, publishers, editors, administrators, the general public? This roundtable seeks to explore capacious thinking about accessibility (in all senses of this word) in academic contexts. Ongoing professional and scholarly conversations in the field of medieval studies (in print, in person, or online) remain unevenly accessible to everyone due to inevitable and welcome variance among medievalists in social class, age, rank, gender, race, religion, socioeconomic status, physical mobility, mental health, family circumstances, or labor conditions. We seek presenters who can address intersecting facets of obstructed access in the field and/or can explore the potential for new practices and social formations to enable access. How could emergent theories of Universal Design (UD) inform conference organization and presentations, organizational structures, publishing platforms, or teaching strategies? How could new technologies alter (positively and negatively) our conceptions of academic work or community? How could new (and continuing) economic realities redefine the accessibility of the Academy? We invite scholarly critiques, narratives of personal experience, manifestoes, diatribes, and creative reconfigurations of access. This roundtable will draw insights from an anonymous online survey on “Access and the Academy” to be conducted by the BABEL Working Group; the data and stories that emerge from this survey may guide the shape of this roundtable discussion.

Robin Norris

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May 12th, 3:30 PM

Access and the Academy (A Roundtable)

Sangren 1920

What does access mean in the social, professional, and institutional landscapes of academia today? How can medieval studies become more accessible to everyone who participates in it: scholars, students, artists, publishers, editors, administrators, the general public? This roundtable seeks to explore capacious thinking about accessibility (in all senses of this word) in academic contexts. Ongoing professional and scholarly conversations in the field of medieval studies (in print, in person, or online) remain unevenly accessible to everyone due to inevitable and welcome variance among medievalists in social class, age, rank, gender, race, religion, socioeconomic status, physical mobility, mental health, family circumstances, or labor conditions. We seek presenters who can address intersecting facets of obstructed access in the field and/or can explore the potential for new practices and social formations to enable access. How could emergent theories of Universal Design (UD) inform conference organization and presentations, organizational structures, publishing platforms, or teaching strategies? How could new technologies alter (positively and negatively) our conceptions of academic work or community? How could new (and continuing) economic realities redefine the accessibility of the Academy? We invite scholarly critiques, narratives of personal experience, manifestoes, diatribes, and creative reconfigurations of access. This roundtable will draw insights from an anonymous online survey on “Access and the Academy” to be conducted by the BABEL Working Group; the data and stories that emerge from this survey may guide the shape of this roundtable discussion.

Robin Norris