Session Title

The Poetics of Rage: Gender, Anger, Form (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Dept. of English, Temple Univ.

Organizer Name

Carissa M. Harris, Sarah Baechle

Organizer Affiliation

Temple Univ., Univ. of Notre Dame

Presider Name

Marjorie Housley

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Paper Title 1

"Ides Aglaecwif": A New Perspective on Gender Relations through the Reading of Women's Anger in Anglo-Saxon Texts

Presenter 1 Name

Natalie M. Whitaker

Presenter 1 Affiliation

St. Louis Univ.

Paper Title 2

Affective Anatomies: The Angry Womb in Late Medieval Thought

Presenter 2 Name

Samantha Katz Seal

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of New Hampshire

Paper Title 3

Prudence's "Semblant of Wratthe" and the Limits of Chaucer's Feminism

Presenter 3 Name

Paul Megna

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Western Australia

Paper Title 4

Anger in the Alehouse: Gendered Community, Genre, and Protest in the "Good Gossips" Carols

Presenter 4 Name

Carissa M. Harris

Paper Title 5

The Letters of Margherita Datini and the Use of Anger as an Expression of Power

Presenter 5 Name

Nicole McLean

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of Maryland

Paper Title 6

That's (Not) Funny: Medieval Laughter, Modern Rage

Presenter 6 Name

Tara Mendola

Presenter 6 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 7

What Does It Mean to Be an Angry Activist Scholar?

Presenter 7 Name

Dorothy Kim

Presenter 7 Affiliation

Vassar College

Start Date

13-5-2017 10:00 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 1005

Description

Women’s anger is central to medieval texts, represented as both problematic and productive: in pastourelles, rape survivors angrily and vehemently curse their rapists; in mystery plays depicting the slaughter of the innocents, mothers fight for their children’s lives with fiercely protective maternal rage; and in a variety of genres, from marital complaints to sermons to proverbs, wives are stereotyped as defiant, sharp-tongued shrews who torment their hapless husbands with wrathful invectives.

In exploring the wide variety of uses for women’s anger, our roundtable aims to situate itself within larger recent scholarly discourses regarding affect and the history of emotions. It focuses not only on the historical significance of women’s anger, but also on the possibilities of harnessing anger for positive scholarly purposes, and has important implications for the future of feminist scholarship. By examining the motivations, representations, and effects of women’s anger, and demonstrating the many ways it can be powerful, generative, and even recuperative, our roundtable seeks to offer new and fruitful ways of thinking about gender, emotion, and social change in the Middle Ages and in medieval studies.

This roundtable seeks short presentations exploring the productive role of women’s anger in medieval texts. We particularly welcome papers examining women’s anger as a means of resistance to gender inequalities, papers which seek to articulate the significance of medieval women’s anger for modern-day teaching, research, and activism, and papers that address the role of female anger within the discipline of medieval studies.

Sarah Baechle

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May 13th, 10:00 AM

The Poetics of Rage: Gender, Anger, Form (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 1005

Women’s anger is central to medieval texts, represented as both problematic and productive: in pastourelles, rape survivors angrily and vehemently curse their rapists; in mystery plays depicting the slaughter of the innocents, mothers fight for their children’s lives with fiercely protective maternal rage; and in a variety of genres, from marital complaints to sermons to proverbs, wives are stereotyped as defiant, sharp-tongued shrews who torment their hapless husbands with wrathful invectives.

In exploring the wide variety of uses for women’s anger, our roundtable aims to situate itself within larger recent scholarly discourses regarding affect and the history of emotions. It focuses not only on the historical significance of women’s anger, but also on the possibilities of harnessing anger for positive scholarly purposes, and has important implications for the future of feminist scholarship. By examining the motivations, representations, and effects of women’s anger, and demonstrating the many ways it can be powerful, generative, and even recuperative, our roundtable seeks to offer new and fruitful ways of thinking about gender, emotion, and social change in the Middle Ages and in medieval studies.

This roundtable seeks short presentations exploring the productive role of women’s anger in medieval texts. We particularly welcome papers examining women’s anger as a means of resistance to gender inequalities, papers which seek to articulate the significance of medieval women’s anger for modern-day teaching, research, and activism, and papers that address the role of female anger within the discipline of medieval studies.

Sarah Baechle