Session Title

Anglo-Saxon Affect and Spirituality

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Erik A. Carlson

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Arkansas-Fort Smith

Presider Name

Wendy Marie Hoofnagle

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Northern Iowa

Paper Title 1

Better than Saints: Affective Models in Anglo-Saxon Hagiography

Presenter 1 Name

Kate Norcross

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign

Paper Title 2

The Functionality and Independence of Sleep and Affect in The Wanderer, Bede's Account of Caedmon's Hymn, and Andreas

Presenter 2 Name

Nicole Songstad

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Missouri-Columbia

Start Date

11-5-2017 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 213

Description

Recent scholarship on the history of the emotions has led to a growing interest in exploring not only the ways emotional experiences are described in Anglo-Saxon texts, but also the kinds of emotional experience the texts were meant to prescribe and elicit, and to what ends. While affective piety has been long studied in later Medieval literature, similar work on Anglo-Saxon England has developed more recently. This session aims to bring together scholars whose work deals with emotion and spirituality in Anglo-Saxon England; particularly welcome are papers dealing with affective vocabulary and experience, the rhetorical or literary representation of emotional or spiritual experience, and the use of text to elicit emotional or spiritual responses.

Kaylin O'Dell

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May 11th, 10:00 AM

Anglo-Saxon Affect and Spirituality

Bernhard 213

Recent scholarship on the history of the emotions has led to a growing interest in exploring not only the ways emotional experiences are described in Anglo-Saxon texts, but also the kinds of emotional experience the texts were meant to prescribe and elicit, and to what ends. While affective piety has been long studied in later Medieval literature, similar work on Anglo-Saxon England has developed more recently. This session aims to bring together scholars whose work deals with emotion and spirituality in Anglo-Saxon England; particularly welcome are papers dealing with affective vocabulary and experience, the rhetorical or literary representation of emotional or spiritual experience, and the use of text to elicit emotional or spiritual responses.

Kaylin O'Dell