Session Title

Manuscripts to Materials

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Research Group on Manuscript Evidence; Societas Magica

Organizer Name

David Porreca

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Waterloo

Presider Name

Jason Roberts

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Texas-Austin

Paper Title 1

Practical Magic: Making Magical Artifacts and Using Them

Presenter 1 Name

Frank Klaassen

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Saskatchewan

Paper Title 2

Response

Presenter 2 Name

Claire Fanger

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Rice Univ.

Paper Title 3

Response

Presenter 3 Name

David Porreca

Paper Title 4

Response

Presenter 4 Name

Marla Segol

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. at Buffalo

Start Date

12-5-2017 6:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 208

Description

To practice learned magic in the pre-modern world one could not simply go to a store or take a course. It was certainly far more complicated than slavishly following a set of techniques. A would-be practitioner had to acquire MSS, interpret them, then acquire the prescribed ingredients and build the necessary equipment based on the written instructions. Once this was accomplished and the processes completed, the results were at once highly evocative and ambiguous, requiring interpretation. Thus at two stages highly creative and imaginative processes had to be called upon. This session + exhibit (focused on hands-on re-creations of ancient and medieval divination techniques) will focus on the intersection between the creative and the learned in pre-modern magical practice.

David Porreca

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 12th, 6:30 PM

Manuscripts to Materials

Bernhard 208

To practice learned magic in the pre-modern world one could not simply go to a store or take a course. It was certainly far more complicated than slavishly following a set of techniques. A would-be practitioner had to acquire MSS, interpret them, then acquire the prescribed ingredients and build the necessary equipment based on the written instructions. Once this was accomplished and the processes completed, the results were at once highly evocative and ambiguous, requiring interpretation. Thus at two stages highly creative and imaginative processes had to be called upon. This session + exhibit (focused on hands-on re-creations of ancient and medieval divination techniques) will focus on the intersection between the creative and the learned in pre-modern magical practice.

David Porreca