Session Title

Dwelling in the Anglo-Saxon Landscape III: Materiality and Image

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Dept. of Archaeology, Durham Univ.

Organizer Name

Sarah J. Semple

Organizer Affiliation

Durham Univ.

Presider Name

David Petts

Presider Affiliation

Durham Univ.

Paper Title 1

Hidden Gems: Boxes and Their Contents in Seventh-Century Anglo-Saxon England

Presenter 1 Name

Katie Haworth

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Durham Univ.

Paper Title 2

Undressing the Body: Nakedness in Anglo-Saxon Visual Culture (Fifth to Seventh Centuries)

Presenter 2 Name

Tristan Lake

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Durham Univ.

Paper Title 3

The Image of the Past: Reassembling Identities through Roman Objects in Early Anglo-Saxon Society

Presenter 3 Name

Indra Werthmann

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Durham Univ.

Start Date

13-5-2017 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1330

Description

In recent years, landscape studies have proved prominent in Anglo-Saxon archaeology. This session brings together new research on the visual and portable material culture of Anglo-Saxon communities. During the 4th to 11th centuries, technological changes and advances are apparent, as well as new artistic and visual repertoires. Moving away from traditional stylistic and typological approaches, this session bring together papers that explore the aesthetics and preferences of early medieval populations, touching on aspects such as the reuse and recycling of artefacts, the creation of new visual material culture, the power of imagery, burial assemblages and everyday objects.

Sarah J. Semple

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May 13th, 3:30 PM

Dwelling in the Anglo-Saxon Landscape III: Materiality and Image

Schneider 1330

In recent years, landscape studies have proved prominent in Anglo-Saxon archaeology. This session brings together new research on the visual and portable material culture of Anglo-Saxon communities. During the 4th to 11th centuries, technological changes and advances are apparent, as well as new artistic and visual repertoires. Moving away from traditional stylistic and typological approaches, this session bring together papers that explore the aesthetics and preferences of early medieval populations, touching on aspects such as the reuse and recycling of artefacts, the creation of new visual material culture, the power of imagery, burial assemblages and everyday objects.

Sarah J. Semple