Session Title

Before and after 1348: Prelude and Consequences of the Black Death

Sponsoring Organization(s)

14th Century Society

Organizer Name

Monica H. Green

Organizer Affiliation

Arizona State Univ.

Presider Name

Monica H. Green

Paper Title 1

Mongolian Deportation Practices and the Demographic Impact of the Conquest of North China

Presenter 1 Name

Christopher P. Atwood

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Pennsylvania

Paper Title 2

Symptom-Addition as Theoretical Strategy: Evidences of Plague in Thirteenth-Century Chinese Medical Sources

Presenter 2 Name

Robert P. W. Hymes

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Columbia Univ.

Paper Title 3

The Black Death in the Territory of the Ulus of Jochi and the Russian Principalities

Presenter 3 Name

Timur Khaydarov

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Kazan National Research Univ.

Start Date

13-5-2017 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 208

Description

Black Death narratives are usually told from the perspective of plague's effects on western Europe, yet it is likely that much of Eurasia and North Africa was affected by the pandemic. In many of those areas, plague “focalized,” becoming embedded in the local fauna and thus persisting for years, or even centuries, thereafter. This session will examine the late medieval pandemic’s origins before 1348 and long-term effects thereafter, including the possible role of Mongol practices of mass deportation and relocation of subject populations in disseminating the disease; the ways Chinese medical writers may have expanded their disease categories to account for this new scourge; and the long-term effects of plague focalization, particularly with respect to the Ulus of Jochi (Mongols of the Golden Horde) in what is now Russia.

Monica H. Green

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May 13th, 3:30 PM

Before and after 1348: Prelude and Consequences of the Black Death

Bernhard 208

Black Death narratives are usually told from the perspective of plague's effects on western Europe, yet it is likely that much of Eurasia and North Africa was affected by the pandemic. In many of those areas, plague “focalized,” becoming embedded in the local fauna and thus persisting for years, or even centuries, thereafter. This session will examine the late medieval pandemic’s origins before 1348 and long-term effects thereafter, including the possible role of Mongol practices of mass deportation and relocation of subject populations in disseminating the disease; the ways Chinese medical writers may have expanded their disease categories to account for this new scourge; and the long-term effects of plague focalization, particularly with respect to the Ulus of Jochi (Mongols of the Golden Horde) in what is now Russia.

Monica H. Green